US Savings Bonds and Taxes

Millions of Americans own U.S. savings bonds. They are the perfect gift for a newborn and young children you want to teach habits of thrift. U.S. savings bonds also get special tax treatment and can be used as a higher education funding tool for some taxpayers. We will focus on the tax benefits of Series EE, Series HH and Series I savings bonds in this article. 

We will start with the basics of each series of bond followed by tax benefits and potential tax pitfalls surrounding savings bond ownership. A savings bond calculator is provided at the end of this post so you can find the current value of U.S. savings bonds you currently own.

 

U.S. Savings Bond Basics

Series EE Savings Bonds

Paper EE bonds were issued at a discount. Example: a $50 face value bond was purchased for $25. Paper EE savings bonds are no longer issued, but continue to accrue interest for 30 year from the issue date.

Electronic EE bonds are purchased in any amount $25 and over and are issued at face value. Example: A $50 bond is purchased for $50. Interest accrues from the face value.

Interest is tax-free at the state or local level, but taxed on the federal level. Interest is not taxable until the year redeemed.

Taxpayer can elect to pay taxes on the interest as it accrues. If the election is made it applies to all EE bonds currently owned and EE bonds purchased in the future. Accrued interest is reported the year of the election. The election must be made on a timely filed return (Rev. Rul. 55-655). The election can be revoked by attaching a statement to the return the year of revocation.

EE bond interest used to pay college tuition may be tax-free (details below under Tax Strategies).

EE bonds purchased between April 30, 1997 and May 1, 2005 earn interest at 90% of the average yields of the 5-year Treasury notes for the preceding six months. Interest accrues monthly (the value of the bond increases each month) and interest compounds semiannually. If the bond does not reach face value in 17 years a one-time adjustment is made to bring the bond’s redemption value to the face value.

EE bonds issued after April 30, 2005 earn a fixed rate of interest. The rate is outlined on the issue date and is fixed for at least 20 years. The price is guaranteed to double (reach the maturity price) in 20 years or the bond is adjusted accordingly. There is a 3-month interest penalty for bonds held less than 5 years.

If the EE bond owner dies there are two ways to report the deferred interest:

  1. Include the accrued interest on the owner’s personal tax return — called the decedent return. Beneficiaries pay tax on interest accrued after death.
  2. All the interest is taxed by the beneficiary when redeemed or, if elected, as it accrues annually.

Series HH Savings Bonds

The U.S. Treasury has discontinued issuing HH bonds after August 31, 2004. 

HH bonds:

  • Were issued at face value.
  • Paid a fixed interest rate semiannually.
  • Are subject to federal income tax.
  • Are not subject to state and local income taxes.
  • Were only issued in exchange for Series E and EE savings bonds.
  • The accrued interest from the E or EE bonds was deferred until the HH bonds matured, but
  • The interest on the HH bond itself cannot be deferred.

 

Series I Savings Bonds

Series I paper bonds come in 5 denominations ($50, $100, $200, $500, $1,000 and $5,000) and you can use your federal income tax refund to purchase them.

Electronic I bonds are available in any amount $25 and over. Purchases can be made via Treasury Direct

Are issued at face value. All interest is paid at redemption or maturity.

The interest rate contains two components:

  1. A fixed rate of interest effective for the life of the bond, and
  2. A semiannual inflation rate that is based on the Consumer Price Index for all Urban consumers (CPI-U). 

Interest is added each month and compounds semiannually. 

Once again, interest is subject to the federal income tax, but is not included in income on the state and local level. Federal income tax is due when either the bond matures or is redeemed. Cash basis taxpayers can elect to pay taxes as the interest accrues using the same rules as for Series EE bonds (where interest is taxed annually) [IRC Sec. 454(a)].

Interest used to pay college tuition may be excluded from income. See Tax Strategies below.

 

Tax Strategies

In a world of low interest rates, U.S. savings bonds can be a powerful option with tax advantages. Not only can you earn a higher rate of return on your emergency funds, but the interest is excluded from income tax on the state and local level.

You also have the option of paying the federal tax on the interest when you redeem the bond or when it matures, OR you can elect to pay as you go. Your personal tax situation will dictate which method affords the lowest tax over all years involved.

I have included two charts in this post: How Long Bonds Earn Interest and Who reports Interest on U.S. Savings Bonds.

The first chart is important because savings bonds have an interest-bearing life. No interest will accrue or be paid after the stated number of years. Interest accrued during the interest-bearing years is not lost even if the bond is held longer than the interest-bearing life term.

The second chart helps you navigate the tricky rules for who reports the income on their federal income tax return. 

If you buy a bond for a grandchild (or any other person for that matter) the interest is reportable by that person unless the bonds are not titled in their name. 

The interest from bonds bought in the name of co-owners (as bonds for children are usually purchased) is reported on the federal income tax return of the co-owner whose funds were used to purchase the bond, even if the other co-owner cashes in the bond and keeps all the proceeds. 

Gifting: Gifting a savings bond prior to maturity accelerates accrued interest. Prior unreported interest is reported in the year the bond is gifted. The bonds need to be reissued into the transferee’s name.

Charitable Contribution: If you donate a savings bond to a charity the interest accrued needs to be included in your federal income. The value of the bond is then included with your other charitable contributions on Schedule A.

Higher Education: The interest on EE and I bonds can be tax-free when used for higher education. there are some rules that need to be followed:

  • The bonds must have been purchased after 1989 by people 24 years of age or older on the first day of the month the bond was purchased.
  • The bonds redeemed must be used for undergraduate, graduate or vocational school tuition and fees (Example: lab fees) for the taxpayer, spouse or dependent.
  • Tuition must be paid in the year the savings bonds are redeemed.
  • Room and board costs and books are not eligible expenses.
  • Qualified education expenses are reduced for tax-free portions of scholarships and other forms of tax-free tuition assistance. Education credits on your tax return also might be reduced. 
  • The bonds must be in the taxpayer’s name, not the dependent (child).
  • Grandparents can only use this tax break if they can claim the grandchild on their tax return as a dependent.
  • Income limits apply. For 2021: Joint returns begin phasing out the education exclusion of U.S. savings bond interest when modified adjusted gross income (MAGI) exceeds $124,800 and is completely phased out at $154,800. Everyone else begins to phase out the exclusion when MAGI exceeds $83,200 and completely phases out at $98,200.
  • Claim the exclusion on Form 8815.
  • Compare the various strategies for tax benefits regarding education expenses. 529 plans, tax credits (American Opportunity Credit or Lifetime Learning Credit) and Coverdell ESAs all play a role. The savings bond interest exclusion is a last line of defense when prior planning has been lacking or when personal facts and circumstances recommend that course of action. 

 

You can use the savings bond calculator  below to determine the current value of paper bonds. 

U.S. Savings Bond Calculator

Log in to your Treasury Direct account for the current value of electronic bonds.

 

More Wealth Building Resources

Worthy Financial offers a flat 5% on their investment. You can read my review here. 

Personal Capital is an incredible tool to manage all your investments in one place. You can watch your net worth grow as you reach toward financial independence and beyond. Did I mention Personal Capital is free?

Medi-Share is a low cost way to manage health care costs. As health insurance premiums continue to sky rocket, there is an alternative preserving the wealth of families all over America. Here is my review of Medi-Share and additional resources to bring health care under control in your household.

QuickBooks is a daily part of life in my office. Managing a business requires accurate books without wasting time. QuickBooks is an excellent tool for managing your business, rental properties, side hustle and personal finances.

cost segregation study can reduce taxes $100,000 for income property owners. Here is my review of how cost segregation studies work and how to get one yourself.

Investing in a Retirement Account is Like Taking Out a Loan

Traditional retirement plan contributions come with a loan attached to it with a variable rate of interest, to be determined at a later date by the tax code and your income level. #interestrate #interest #loan #IRS #taxesEver since the FIRE (financial independence/early retirement) movement hit the scene I started to question conventional financial wisdom. 

Most of the advice preached was re-purposed from generations past. A penny saved is a penny earned turned into a variety of frugal anecdotes. You can’t read Proverbs (from the Bible) and not recognize the many similarities in advice. Sound money principles have ancient roots.

For a time the FIRE community welcomed me as one of their own before I stepped back a bit to cut my own path. (No sense in another voice calling out the same message.) I’m still part of the community, but gave myself permission to question the dictums of said community. The hope was to build a bridge from where we are to a higher level.

It also became clear my net worth was near the top of the demographic. This bothered me and caused me to conclude something was wrong.  How could a backwoods farm boy with nothing more than a high school education, a few college courses and a full personal library do better than virtually all within a community so dedicated to wealth?

I don’t trust luck to carry me that far. It had to be something else.

Then I started reading what was published in the tax field and felt a great disturbance in the force. While the advice was fundamentally sound, it also lacked in effectiveness if brought to task. All too often blogs were using IRS publications as their authority. (The IRS is NOT a tax authority; they are a bill collector.) If people followed this advice and the IRS ever challenged (likely with so many people tempting fate) there was a real risk of loss. (If you go to Tax Court and say you used an IRS publication as your substantial authority you lose automatically even of you a right! IRS publications have zero authority in Tax Court.)

Sometimes the math was fuzzy. A blogger might claim a certain level of frugality when it didn’t add up. Some claimed a level of wealth that also didn’t add up. Either the rules of mathematics were suspended or someone was trying to pull the wool over their reader’s eyes.

The biggest area of concern involved retirement accounts. The mantra of filling retirement accounts to the hilt for long periods of time has some obvious issues

Some retirement account problems are less apparent. Everyone keeps saying this is the best thing since sliced bread. But is it? 

So I started running some numbers and it wasn’t as clear as most are led to believe. There was something fundamentally wrong with the advice.

 

Numbers Game

The issue is with traditional retirement accounts (IRA, 401(k), 457, 403(b), Keogh, profit-sharing and cash balance plans); Roth type retirement plans don’t have this issue.

Don't lose your retirement account to hidden taxes. Current tax savings are dwarfed by future taxes on all the gains at the highest rate allowed by law. It's your money! Don't give it to the IRS. #retirement #account #hidden #taxesRoth style retirement plans don’t get an up-front deduction, but grow tax-free. Most financial blogs consider this the best animal in the yard. I agree.

A close cousin — if you qualify for it — is the health savings account where you get a deduction and tax-free growth, to be used for qualified medical expenses. The biggest drawback of the HSA is the amount you can invest annually is relatively small. 

Roth retirement plans are limited in many cases based on income on if the employer has the option in their 401(k) . The maximum Roth IRA contribution is also relatively small. (Exact limits are excluded from this post so changes in the limit don’t distract from the evergreen content.)

The mega-backdoor Roth (a favorite of the FIRE community) allows for sizable Roth contributions with one caveat: it’s probably illegal (according to the IRS). The IRS hasn’t attacked the mega-backdoor Roth because there is no current revenue to be raised by taking such action; Roth investments are not deductible.

However, once these accounts grow in size the IRS could come back and disallow the tax-free advantage, plus interest and penalties. If the IRS has a kind heart (ahem) they could forgo the excess contribution issues which would certainly mean penalties several hundred percent of the entire investment. You decide what course you wish to take. 

The safest retirement plan route means traditional retirement plan investments after you maximized your Roth contributions. Or is it?

 

Loan Document

Traditional retirement plan contributions come with a loan attached to it with a variable rate of interest, to be determined at a later date by the tax code and your income level.

All you debt-free warriors should feel a bit nervous at this point. Just as a mortgage-free home still has loan-like obligations (property taxes, insurance, maintenance), a traditional retirement account has an unannounced interest-like expense and it is a big one.

And this is what disturbed me so much that I had to publish a post on it. 

We all know that traditional retirement accounts get a tax deduction at your ordinary tax rate up to the retirement plan contribution limits. We should also know that these accounts grow tax-deferred and that all distributions are taxed at ordinary rates.

This is a real problem if your goal is to maximize your net worth. In the early years the tax benefit makes it seem like it is the best deal on the planet. But as time passes the math tells a darker tale.

Let’s start with a simple example to get a fundamental understanding of this matter:

Joe contributes $10,000 to his t401(k). This is subtracted from his income on the W-2 and never reaches his tax return. His tax bracket is 30%.

We will disregard actual tax brackets as they change over time and we are more interested in a workable formula for determining the best course currently and for future readers as well.

The good news is Joe saved $3,000 on his taxes this year. However, in 40 years, when Joe retires, he discovers his investment in a broad-based index fund performed as index funds have over long periods in the past: around 7% per year on average. Joe is a very happy man! He now has $149,744.58. 

If Joe were to take the entire amount in one year it would be a fairly large tax. However, Joe decides to take the money out over a number of years. As a result his ordinary tax rate is only 15%. (We will disregard taxes on Social Security benefits and other similar issues to make calculations easier.)

Joe now has a tax bill of $22,462. (Numbers are rounded.) That is $19,462 more in additional tax! Call the 19 grand a tax or anything else you want, but it looks like interest on the $3,000 to this accountant.

Even though Joe saw his tax rate decline by half in retirement he still saw his tax bill increase over 700%. His interest rate would be slightly less than 5.2% annualized in this situation assuming Joe never saw his account value increase after he started taking distributions, an unlikely event.

 

Early Payments

If I approached you and said I would borrow you $20,000 at 5.2% would you take it? Unless you have bad credit that is a high interest rate, especially since it in not deductible. Worse, you can’t make early payments to get out of the deal! You can’t jump ship until you are at least 59 1/2 years old. And if you are stubborn I’ll kick you overboard at 70 1/2. 

The good news is I’m a nice guy and will not do that to you. On the other hand, Congress has passed laws the IRS carries out doing just that.

And we haven’t seen the worst part yet! Retirement plan distribution included in income can cause more of your Social Security benefits to be taxed and can also increase the premium you pay for Medicare once you reach age 65.

A small tax deduction today can do real damage in the future. This is why I say I want multiple tax benefits before I get excited about a tax deduction

All this assumes your tax bracket drops when you retire. Considering the massive government fiscal deficits during a strong economy, it seems to this accountant taxes will go up in the future. And if your income remains high in retirement your tax bracket will also be higher.

Consider this: If Joe had a 30% ordinary tax rate on his retirement plan distributions his taxes would have climbed to $44,923, a full 7% annualized rate. For people with good credit this is a massive interest rate and almost nobody is thinking about this.

 

The Cold Equations

Joe’s example is unfair. First, Joe will put a lot more into his retirement plan over his lifetime, therefore, the damage will be much larger.

Second, retirement plan distributions happen over a number of years. While this might sound like a solution to the problem, it actually makes it worse as the investments continue to grow over time.

Third, smaller account balances experience the same issue only with smaller numbers and that tax rates might be lower due to the lower income level.

Fourth, early retirement does not solve the problem. Yes, you can take a limited amount of money from a traditional retirement account before age 59 1/2 without penalty under Section 72(t). This only reduces the amount of time the money has to grow; it doesn’t resolve the issue.

No matter how you cut it, traditional retirement accounts are best viewed as loans from the government, due in retirement. If you don’t pay the piper, your beneficiaries will.

 

 

Alternatives

Your experience will differ from that of others. You can use the simple example above to determine your implied interest rate assessed as tax in the future. You may discover this isn’t an issue for you. Or, you might need a moment for reflective prayer.

We saw that greed for a current tax deduction produces a 5%+ interest rate loan from the government, payable in retirement. So, what alternatives are there?

The best comparison is doing nothing at all (investing in a non-qualified account). You still invest in the same index fund. Dividends and capital gains are taxed at the lower long-term capital gains (LTCG) tax rate (15% or less for most taxpayers) instead of ordinary rates later (up to 37% federal, plus state income taxes). 

Since the money is outside a traditional retirement account you don’t have to worry about early distributions or required minimum distributions. And if you die your beneficiaries get a step-up in basis the retirement accounts don’t get. Gains on these investments are also taxed at the lower LTCG rate. 

 

Matching

I can hear the complaint already: What if my employer matches?

A valid argument. We’ll go back to Joe again and assume his employer matched his contribution 100%.

Joe invested $10,000 of his own money and his employer matched his retirement plan contribution with another $10,000. 

Joe still gets a deduction worth $3,000 for his contribution. The employer’s match is free money and not taxed until Joe takes the money out.

In total, Joe has $20,000 invested in his retirement account. His account grows to $299,489 in 40 years. The tax on this at a 15% tax rate is: $44,923. 

The initial tax benefit to Joe is $3,000, plus $10,000 from his employer, for a total of $13,000. The implied interest rate in this situation is around 3.15%.

The lesson of this part of the story is that using your employer’s retirement plan up to the match maximum is still a good idea for most. After hitting the matching maximum you might be better served putting the rest into a non-qualified account, however.

 

Smart readers will also be quick to point out the extra tax savings means you have more to invest which mitigates any of the extra taxes owed in the future. This would be true if people actually did that.

When was the last time you invested your tax savings from a traditional retirement account investment? Where did you invest it? Uh-huh. Thought so. You spend the tax savings as most do.

(If you are one of the few who actually pull the tax savings from the family budget and invest it in a non-qualified account my hat comes off to you. You still need to run the numbers to verify the best course of action.)

 

Facts and Circumstances

You can’t read tax law for more than a few minutes before running across the words “facts and circumstances”. And this situation is no different.

The IRS has hidden interest-like charges on retirement accounts. Here is how to avoid them. #avoidtaxes #taxes #retirement #IRS #interestI gave you the tools to build a working plan based on your facts and circumstances. Use a future value calculator to determine the interest rate the tax code is forcing you to pay if you use traditional retirement accounts. 

Employer matching is a real benefit that is diminished by the tax code after very long periods of time. (I would focus on the employer match closely as real value can be found there.)

After the employer match and available Roth retirement plan contributions allowed are exhausted you might find non-qualified accounts the best course of action, for you

The important thing is that you are reading this. That means you are more likely to run your numbers for the best options, for you

There are a lot of factors at play. Index funds still kick out dividends and some capital gains which are currently taxed. This slightly reduced the implied interest rate of the traditional retirement plan if you are prone to investing tax savings. It also assumes you keep your fingers off the pile until retirement. 

The one thing to remember is that deferred taxes frequently come with an implied interest rate paid as a higher future tax.

This is the kind of stuff I think about in the dark of the night. It might also be the prime reason I top the net worth list at Rockstar Finance.

 

 

More Wealth Building Resources

Credit Cards can be a powerful money management tool when used correctly. Use this link to find a listing of the best credit card offers. You can expand your search to maximize cash and travel rewards.

Personal Capital is an incredible tool to manage all your investments in one place. You can watch your net worth grow as you reach toward financial independence and beyond. Did I mention Personal Capital is free?

Side Hustle Selling tradelines yields a high return compared to time invested, as much as $1,000 per hour. The tradeline company I use is Tradeline Supply Company. Let Darren know you are from The Wealthy Accountant. Call 888-844-8910, email Darren@TradelineSupply.com or read my review.

Medi-Share is a low cost way to manage health care costs. As health insurance premiums continue to sky rocket, there is an alternative preserving the wealth of families all over America. Here is my review of Medi-Share and additional resources to bring health care under control in your household.

QuickBooks is a daily part of life in my office. Managing a business requires accurate books without wasting time. QuickBooks is an excellent tool for managing your business, rental properties, side hustle and personal finances.

cost segregation study can reduce taxes $100,000 for income property owners. Here is my review of how cost segregation studies work and how to get one yourself.

Worthy Financial offers a flat 5% on their investment. You can read my review here. 

Permanent Interest Free Loans

debt-1Credit cards were always a powerful cash management tool for business owners. Individuals can harness the same power, but frequently use credit cards wrong, piling on high interest debt, and suffering financially. In times past, credit cards allowed for easy payment and tracking of expenses. As banks grew more competitive, the opportunities also grew. Most people are familiar with cash-back and bonus offers when opening a new credit card, but there is so much more.

There is a whole additional universe of value available from credit cards missed because it is buried in fine print. In this post we will focus on one of those benefits: interest free loans. Tomorrow I will focus on the litany of advantages you can use to make your life simpler.

Interest free loans from credit cards are not for everyone. I will focus on three groups who should find value in the strategy I will soon outline. The three groups are: people digging out of debt, people interested in accelerating their investments in index funds, and individuals and business with seasonal revenue.

How it Works

If you have a credit card you are aware of those checks they send you for cash advances at a 0% interest rate. That is not what we are talking about here. Those cash advance checks are junk because they charge a 2%-4% fee upfront. When I say interest free, I also mean fee free.

Many banks offer credit cards with a 0% interest rate on purchases the first 12-20 months you have the card. This provides a limited opportunity to cut some spending on interest. The strategy is as follows: You get two credit cards per year and use them like this: The first card is used for six months and the second card (acquired six months later) the next six months. See where I am going with this?

Okay, if you put every possible purchase on your credit card to max out cash, bonus, and travel benefits, you can also reduce your interest expense should you still be working out of debt. The goal is to never pay credit card interest ever! You have 12-20 months to pay off the card in full. By paying the minimum the first six months and then paying the card off over the next six months you effectively keep around half your spending available for investment or debt reduction.

It looks something like this:

SpendingPaymentBalance
$2,000$25$1,975
$2,000$25$3,950
$2,000$50$5,900
$2,000$75$7,825
$2,000$100$9,725
$0$2,000$7,725
$0$2,000$5,725
$0$2,000$3,725
$0$2,000$1,725
$0$1,725$0

 

Since you should be paying your current spending in full each month, you are never spending more than you have available to pay off the credit card. I used 10 months as an example, but you can expand this to any duration, depending on the 0% grace period of the cards involved.

It sounds like a lot of horsing around to avoid interest if you are on your way to financial security. It is. For many years I worked as a Dave Ramsey endorsed local provider. If I felt the client was disciplined enough to handle this strategy, I would teach it. By utilizing two new credit cards per year we could accelerate high interest debt reduction. In the above example we could reduce debt by nearly ten grand before we started paying off the new card.

During the 0% grace period, all funds used to pay the new card would be funneled to high interest debt. Then payments would be turned back to the new card so the balance was retired before the 0% grace period ended.

Problems

There are serious issues surrounding this strategy. First, if you have lots of debt you might also have a bad credit score. Getting a new credit card every six months could be an issue. Second, and this is the big one, it takes discipline. People with loads of debt have not been good in the past with money. Their discipline is suspect before we start.

If you have the discipline you can reduce some of that high interest debt so you can start investing toward financial independence. Once you have reduced your debt burden the rotating credit card strategy can be used to funnel cash into investments, but the returns are diminishing.

It is important when you are adding debt interest free to the new card that all funds to pay for that spending is allocated to high interest debt payments. Ten thousand dollars of payments shifted to a credit card at 18% is a $1,800 in annual savings. This snowballs (using Dave Ramsey’s term) into faster and faster debt reduction.

Another problem is not considering alternatives. Refinancing debt at a lower rate might be an easier and better solution.

Debt Reduction

Moving six months of spending payments to high interest debt adds to serious interest savings. Discipline is the hardest part. Delaying high interest expenses six months to a year still leaves you in debt! Bad spending habits in the past got you here; financial discipline is the only way out. Rolling up your sleeves and slashing spending is required, applying the reduced spending to debt reduction. It isn’t easy. If it was you would not be in this position.

Remember, you are not spending more than you normally would. You only shift your spending to a new credit card for half the 0% grace period and then use a new card while paying off the first. You are still accelerating your other debt reduction at the same time.

Investment Acceleration

I don’t like this idea, but I will share it for informational purposes only. When debt is eliminated you can keep using the same strategy to funnel six months of spending into index funds. I think it is a lot of extra work once you are building your net worth to invest a half year of spending a bit sooner. You make the call.

A Personal Story

The third group benefiting from this strategy is owners of seasonal businesses. We will use my tax office as a guinea pig. As a tax office I am flush with cash April 15th. Year-end spending challenges the business finances while revenue tends to be lower than any other time of the year.

Up front, I never carry a credit card balance, but use credit cards for every possible business and personal expense. The business does have a line of credit which rarely gets used except as a tax management tool. If I can allocate funds in a way that reduces taxes I will use the LOC for a short period of time.

debt-1500774_960_720Due to the seasonal nature of my business (it isn’t so seasonal lately) we can apply the above strategy to manage cash flow. As the guinea pig, I acquired a credit card with a cash-back bonus and travel rewards. I will put every possible expense on the card until tax season when I will pay it in full. I’ve never done this before.

I really don’t need the extra funding this year for any major projects or tax reduction strategies, but it is a kick in the pants to harvest a few more bonuses.

Seasonal businesses can use this credit card strategy to avoid interest expenses while maintaining the business between busy times. Once again discipline is required. It is too easy to build debt. If you have problems handling money, this isn’t for you.

A large number of readers here are well on their way to financial independence or are already retired. I get enough requests from people starting out to make this post a valuable addition to the herd. Use it as you see fit. Also consider modifying it to your needs. The most important point is to think differently. If you act like everyone else, you will have what everyone else has. Better yet, if you tend to follow the crowd, hook up with a frugal group. It makes it easier when people around you tend to spend less.

Tomorrow I will dig deeper into credit card advantages everyone can use.

Use this link to help you research credit cards. There are a lot of choices. I recommend a card with a bonus and ample cash back. I did not include any of these benefits in the illustration above, but they increase the value. Finally, if you order a credit card and receive approval when you use the banner below, I will receive compensation. I thank you if you do. If you prefer to avoid such arrangements you can go straight to www.cardratings.com. You get the same exact thing, but I do not receive compensation. No hard feeling either way.

 

Note: Check the TWA Recommends page for all the latest best credit card rewards programs.