Restarting the economy is going to be more difficult than it was stopping it. A vigorous discussion on the topic is desperately needed as many feel talking about opening the economy is akin to reigniting the infection rate when in reality the discussion is needed to formulate an appropriate and workable plan.

Talking about restarting the economy is good policy. Shutting down large swaths of economic activity was necessary for public health. And for the most part it was a fairly easy process: governors gave the order and their state ground to a halt as people sheltered in place, giving COVID-19 no viable path to propagate. The same happened around the world. It is The Day the World Stopped.

The spread of COVID-19 had slowed and in many countries has all but stopped. Concerns the virus is picking up steam where social distancing is relaxed is still a real risk. However, policies designed to slow the spread of the virus appear to be working. Multiple medical therapies hold promise and a massive effort to develop a vaccine are in progress. A vaccine would be a game changer, but realistically that is still as much as 1 ½ years away before it becomes available. The economic price would be too high, and the resulting harm to human health from lack of services, too damaging to wait over a year before reopening the closed parts of the economy.

Reopening the economy can begin in as little as a few weeks to a month if handled properly. Germany has made signs they are ready to slowly restart economic activity. China, the first to suffer the scourge, has already reopened much of its shuttered economy. The real question now is: How well will it work? If the virus takes off again it will set us back. However, if enough people have built an immunity while social distancing is still practiced, many parts of the economy can reopen.

Turning economic activity back on will not be like flicking a light switch. There are several issues when restarting an economy after such a brutal and abrupt stoppage. We will now turn our discussion to an appropriate and safe way to reopen a shuttered economy. Even more important than opening closed businesses is how to get money flowing again. If nobody shows up for the party we are no better off.

 

A Plan for Reopening Shuttered Industries

While it is true the current economic downturn may be the most abrupt (fastest) and deepest decline in modern history, it isn’t the first time an economy had to plan on restarting after such a shock to the system. The situation (and rules) are different from rebuilding after the destruction from war; the rules, however, have many similarities, albeit on a much smaller scale. 

After World War II, Germany and Britain were in ruins, along with much of the rest of Europe and Japan and other areas of the Far East. While a contagious virus wasn’t running wild, a plan was developed for rebuilding the destroyed areas. Without the Marshall Plan, Europe would have suffered much longer as they worked to rebuild. A similar reconstruction plan was instituted in Japan. 

We don’t need anything as drastic as a Marshall Plan today. But the lessons can still be learned.  For example, you didn’t start rebuilding a war torn Britain by investing in industries that heavily rely on infrastructure before the infrastructure was funded and well on its way to becoming operational. In other words, there has to be an order to the reopening of an economy. 

It can happen fast. The Marshal Plan was a 4-year plan to fund investment in rebuilding cities and industries, and remove trade barriers between European nations and those nations and the United States. 

We do not need 4 years to reignite our economy! Still, it will take time and it will not always be a smooth process. Prior to a vaccine for COVID-19 there stands a strong chance there will be pockets of infection flareups. Fear will be the common enemy.

It would be unwise to open everything at once. A step-by-step process will allow for the fastest opening of the economy without undue risk to public health. The real question is: What gets opened first, second and so forth and to what degree?

Step 1 

Before any plan can work social distancing must be practiced by the public until an effective vaccine is found, effective and fast testing is available or most people are inoculated. If enough people develop a natural immunity (prior infection) the same result can be achieved, if only over a much longer time frame and higher number of dead.

A requirement everyone wear a mask in public would also go a long way, if not very fashionable. Social distancing and a mask would reduce the spread of COVID-19 to such an extent it might not remain viable for long as it can’t keep finding new hosts.

A cheap, fast and easy way to test for those currently contagious would also allow for a faster opening of economic activity.

Step 2

The first businesses to reopen should be retail establishments. It is easy to practice social distancing at a furniture mart and therefore, these businesses should be allowed to open soon.

Certain service businesses can be opened at this time as well. The law office, bank and public buildings and parks all allow for social distancing without much inconvenience to people.

Factories and other manufacturing facilities can reopen along with service businesses and retail outlets. Safety policies might mean some factories run at less than full capacity, but they would be open and should be able to find ways to slowly increase business activity until fully operational, or nearly so.

Churches and other places of worship would also be some of the first places to reopen. 

Step 3

After an adequate waiting period (say two or three weeks) to determine the virus is not spreading faster again, it will be time to open even larger swaths of economic activity. 

This is where it gets difficult. Bars and restaurants really could use a return to normalcy. Unfortunately, large groups of people gather at these establishments and social distancing is extremely difficult. Unless a natural immunity or vaccine reduces risk, large gatherings are a serious threat to reigniting the infection rate. 

Instead, it might be proper to open salons. Social distancing is impossible in these situations; by design the hair stylist has to be close to you to cut your hair. However, a mask might be enough to solve the problem. Yes, the hair stylist is close to the customer when cutting her hair, but the room isn’t crowded tight with people. A mask and hand washing between clients could do the trick. (This is more important than you think! Do you want to now what our world would look like after people go a year without any hair care? Yikes!)

An accurate and fast way to test for those currently contagious would also facilitate a quicker opening of these businesses.

Step 4

As serious as the matter is, certain businesses need to reopen as some point. Gyms are a high risk place, but social distancing, frequent hand washing and sanitizing equipment between use should make it a viable solution to reopening our exercise centers. A fast, accurate and low cost testing method to reveal who is contagious would certainly allow for these establishments to open sooner.

Restaurants are next. We might limit the number of people in the room and require masks for all employees. (Kind of hard for patrons to eat while wearing a mask.) The same for bars. A reasonable plan would be to allow a certain number of people per area and slowly raise the density of people allowed per gathering as long as infection rates remain low.

Step 5

The hardest hit is the last to reopen. Concerts and sporting events pack people in too tight for proper safety with a highly contagious virus on the loose. Yelling and cheering at a packed sporting event all but assures you will face a high risk of infection if an infected individual is present. Sporting events with empty stands is an option, but there is something about a full stadium that makes the event serious, real.

Travel will also be among the last to fully reopen. Packing a plane is not the best idea when a highly contagious virus is on the loose. Proper precautions could be taken to reduce risk. Disinfecting after each use and masks on public transportation would make sense. Testing, when available, would allow for a full opening of economic activity even if a vaccine is not yet ready.

 

These steps do not have to take place in a vacuum. Fully reopening the economy could happen in a few months with most business activity functioning at a high level within 30 days. Accurate, fast and low cost testing would also speed the reopening of the economy. A vaccine would be the best option, but the economy will still need time to reset as it opens after such a shock. Things will not pick up where they left off.

We have learned a lot about COVID-19 so far. Treatments are getting better and more equipment is available. That reduces the seriousness of the infection. Even without a vaccine there will be a growing number of people with a natural immunity. As we discover how effective an immunity infection provides, we can also focus on how many have been infected without serious symptoms. At some point we need to know how many people already are not at risk due to immunity. Reinfection issues will need to be addressed.

It is growing clearer each day we can reopen economic activity without undue risk to human health. There are measurable risks to locking people down to prevent the spread of disease. At some point it is a better choice to take precautions while letting the herd out in the pasture.

 

Velocity of Money

The velocity of money is the gorilla in the room nobody is talking about. Opening businesses is only the first step. My guess is there will be a surge in business activity as the wildlife gets a whiff of fresh air. Then the economic reality of the family budget will bear down. 

The stimulus money will certainly help, but that money helped people muddle through the abyss. Some jobs are not coming back. Some businesses will not survive the assault inflicted upon them. There is no amount of money that will put things back exactly as they were.

Will back rent need to be paid or will landlords suffer the loss? Will all employees be called back to work? What about businesses that close? If tenants are forced to pay a backlog of rent it will retard tenants’ spending on other goods and services. If the landlord swallows the loss the landlord will be forced to reduce spending. Either way money will not move as fast in the economy. The same applies to employees not called back to work as their employer closed permanently. 

The same applies to mortgage payments and other loans. Will payments be pushed to the back of the loan? Regardless, the family budget is worse off. Many questions still need answering for a smooth re-opening of economic activity.

And will jobs still pay the same with higher unemployment? 

 

 

Bars and restaurants might get an initial surge of business, but not all industries will enjoy such a bump. Travel and entertainment take time to set up. Planning a concert takes time. The day the switch is flipped is not the day people have airline tickets to get away. People will start closer to home before venturing further. Planning a vacation will not happen instantly.

And some industries are of the trickle-down type. For Boeing to sell more airplanes, airlines need to book more passengers. The money flows downhill and Boeing is not first in line for a check.

The above chart shows a damning detail about the American economy. From 1960 to 1990 the speed at which money exchanged hands in the economy was static. The accelerating economic growth of the 1990s bumped the velocity of money a bit higher before coming back down in the early 2000s.

But ever since the Great Recession the speed that money changes hands has been slowing. Part of the issue is the level of the money supply. The Federal Reserve has not been bashful about increasing the money supply over the last decade. If people don’t increase spending at the same pace the Fed increases the money supply we see the velocity of money come down. Each new dollar the Fed dumps into the economy has less effect than the one prior. This is a form of spin-down and it always comes to an end at some point.

That has been a problem for the last decade. More and more money gets pumped into the economy, but it has had a smaller and smaller effect. Money just does not move the way it used to, even when more is pumped into the system. 

The third major bear market in 20 years might drop the velocity of money even lower. A vibrant, healthy economy has a strong velocity of money as money is earned, spent, saved and invested. For a decade we have seen money pumped into the economy and mostly it arrived with a loud thump. Most of the past decade of economic gains is attributable to public spending on the national credit card. Without this so-called stimulus, we had no discernible economic gains. I will leave it to you, kind readers, to determine if this is a viable long-term solution.

The real challenge is not the reopening of businesses; it is the reinvigorating of the movement of money. If everyone has a million dollars, but they all sit on it — none of it moving — there is still no economic activity, at least as measured by Gross Domestic Product which tracks how much money has been put to work buying goods and services. If the velocity of money slows even more it could be a very anemic recovery, indeed! Or worse.

The economic expansion after the Great Recession was slow by historical standards. It is also a likely reason it lasted so long since the excesses of too rapid of growth were avoided.

But slow growth is like watching paint dry or suffering water torture if you need a job or are working to build a business. If money isn’t moving it means it isn’t going to wages or small businesses either. 

The challenge is starting a national dialog on reopening the economy as soon as safely possible and developing plans to avoid an incredibly slow recovery, even slower than the 2009-2019 expansion.

It seems during my entire adult life (from the early 1980s) each economic expansion has started slower and was harder to accelerate. Interest rates have dropped for 30 years until we are now at 0% yet again. If the Fed creates more money, only to see the velocity of money slow more, there will be little value gained by future Fed actions. 

Maybe a Keynesian style government infrastructure spending program might do the trick. However, China has tried to do this every time they want to spike growth and the benefits are not all they desired.

I guess the Fed could print money forever without consequences and give it away as a basic income. I also have a bridge I’d like to sell you if you believe there is such a free lunch without consequences. 

I certainly do not have all the answers. I think my plan for opening the economy is sound with some modest tweaks by the powers that be. The real problems start when the economy is back open and it isn’t what we remember when we last saw it.

And we better start tossing ideas around because I think time is running shorter than anyone wants to admit.

 

 

More Wealth Building Resources

Personal Capital is an incredible tool to manage all your investments in one place. You can watch your net worth grow as you reach toward financial independence and beyond. Did I mention Personal Capital is free?

Worthy Financial offers a flat 5% on their investment. You can read my review here. 

Medi-Share is a low cost way to manage health care costs. As health insurance premiums continue to sky rocket, there is an alternative preserving the wealth of families all over America. Here is my review of Medi-Share and additional resources to bring health care under control in your household.

QuickBooks is a daily part of life in my office. Managing a business requires accurate books without wasting time. QuickBooks is an excellent tool for managing your business, rental properties, side hustle and personal finances.

cost segregation study can reduce taxes $100,000 for income property owners. Here is my review of how cost segregation studies work and how to get one yourself.

 

This blog post is part of the 3rd Annual Suicide Prevention & Awareness Month blog tour. If you are feeling suicidal, please call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255 or text HOME to 741741.

 

Call it First World problems; the minor inconveniences of life: the traffic light turned red at the last moment, you’re surprised by a repair, you discover you have to work past the age of 30. We live in such opportune times it’s easy to forget real difficulties exist. Some right in our own communities.

September is National Suicide Prevention and Awareness Month and Melanie Lockert of Dear Debt is asking personal finance bloggers once again to take up the keyboard to prevent unnecessary tragedy. I participated in the first two Suicide Prevention Blog Tours but intended to sit this one out when I got the email. I had no idea what I wanted to write. I said what I needed to say and had no more to add to the heap of literature on suicide prevention. Then I walked to the mailbox.

A Difficult Weekend

The Suicide Prevention Blog Tour is designed to bring attention debt, depression and suicide. Some bloggers keep it simple, pushing the simple message of hope and encouragement. I prefer a longer emotional story to illustrate my point.

The statistics are damning. Suicide is the second leading cause of death among people in their early 20s and the overall rate of suicide increased 28% from 1999 to 20161. Mental health is a serious factor in suicide, but not always a factor. Complicating matters is that most suicide attempts are not the result of one issue only.

September is Suicide Awareness and Prevention Month. Debt is a leading cause of suicide. Debt help is available. Debt free. Debt freedom. #wealthyaccountant #debt #suicide #suicideawareness #suicideprevention #debtsnowball #debtfreeFinancial problems (the focus of the Suicide Prevention Blog Tour) are the fifth leading cause of all suicides1. Relationship problems are the leading cause. And that is where First World problems and a short walk to my mailbox collided.

Melanie’s email had already started sliding down the list of unanswered emails when I took that fateful walk to the roadside. Just in time for the Labor Day weekend, the current issue of National Geographic had arrived.

The cover of the magazine was disturbing, an ominous sign. This is the kind of reading I bury and get back to much later if ever. I normally read National Geographic from beginning to end religiously. This time I put the magazine next to my reading chair with the cover facing down. It was too hard to look at.

But like a Stephen King novel, it kept calling out to me. Slowly I paged through the magazine and gathered information on the disturbing cover. The story was about Katie Stubblefield and the face transplant she received.

I dared to start my routine read of the issue with the letter From the Editor and was in tears before I finished the letter I was so moved. I was vested in the story and the tragedy that brought this young woman into a nightmare I doubted I could ever personally survive.

20 Seconds that Changed a Life Forever

Katie was born to a loving family and grew to be a beautiful and intelligent woman. She was plagued with a perfectionist personality. When her perfect world started to crumble a final piece to the puzzle would put her face before the world.

Katie struggled to be the best at everything. One day she discovered messages on her boyfriend’s phone to another woman. He immediately broke up with her when she confronted him.

Katie went home and locked herself in the bathroom with her father’s rifle and cried. With no history of mental illness, depression or indication of suicidal tendencies, she put the barrel of the rifle under her chin and pulled the trigger.

But Katie did not die.

Her brother found her in a pool of blood, her face blown off from the blast. She was rushed to the hospital and stabilized. When the local medical community could do no more she was sent to the Cleveland Clinic.

I encourage you to read the September 2018 issue of National Geographic. Katie’s story is powerful and moving. Katie does get a face transplant from a woman who died of an overdose. The story cuts a wide wound in here (pointing to my chest). The words that stuck with me the most in the article were uttered by Katie’s mother, Alesia, “It was one moment. One moment, 20 seconds, changed our lives.”

Duty of the FI/RE2 Community

You would think a community of people well on their way toward financial independence would not have money problems so severe they would contemplate suicide. Unfortunately, many people who come to this community have had a traumatic life experience that forced them to reevaluate. These people are at risk of tripping over the cliff. Bloggers, podcasters and YouTubers of the community must always be cognizant of the people they serve lest they discover one day a promising life was ended because we took FI for granted.

September is Suicide Awareness and Prevention Month. Debt is a leading cause of suicide. Debt help is available. Debt free. Debt freedom. Debt snowball. IRS debt. #wealthyaccountant #debt #suicide #suicideawareness #suicideprevention #debtsnowball #debtfree #irsdebtEveryone is carrying a burden! Money can provide comfort and options in life, but it doesn’t change the strain of a serious medical situation. Divorce rips a family apart and the kids suffer most. Money will not salve that wound.

And mental health is a serious medical issue that money does not magically fix. Yes, wealth allows for most, if not all, medical options. Still, the depression can strike anyone at any time. Instead of shaking our heads and wondering why when we hear a person with financial independence and enjoying and early retirement puts a gun to their head, we should remember money didn’t make them sick; a medical condition did.

Maybe you’re lucky and don’t have depression. As a member of this community you are morally bound to help others who do suffer. Your wealth is not an invitation to unrestrained hedonism. When we see a fallen soul we are duty-bound to help. Like the military, we don’t leave one of our own on the battlefield.

Watchful Eyes

Nobody saw it coming when Katie Stubblefield snapped. There were signs in afterthought, but nothing anybody could have recognized. And that can happen. A singular event can trigger a massive negative response. It is hard to understand what can make us feel helpless and unwilling to continue on.

Fortunately, most people tell us they are walking into the dark. We must keep our eyes and ears open for the warning signs. Significant loss is a leading reason people tumble into the darkness. Depression can rear its ugly head for the first time after the loss of a loved one. Being shunned by people you love and respect can wreck devastation on the psyche.

I’ve been around this crowd long enough to know a few struggle with a heavy burden. Even our kind-hearted and fearless leader, Melanie, has struggled. She put debt behind her and discovered how deep the despair many feel with insurmountable financial problems. Melanie also suffered the loss of a loved one after a relatively long relationship. He decided to go his own way. I can’t imagine her pain. Still, I listen from a distance (mostly her online comments) for hints of trouble. Those closest to her should be even more vigilant.

As a community we are very fortunate. Even if we are deep in debt and taking our first steps toward freedom we are incredibly blessed! No matter how difficult the road ahead may seem, we know we don’t walk alone. There are numerous souls who have gone before willing to help, willing to lend a hand, to pull you up, to help you stand tall and straight.

Luck has Nothing to do with It

Katie did not get lucky. If she were lucky she would never have put the gun to her head. She will get a new lease on life. It will be anything but easy. The medical challenges ahead will never cease. After four years she finally has a face. The surgeries and pain and struggle will be relentless and unending. Building FI is similar in many ways. We work hard, save, invest and care deeply.

September is Suicide Awareness and Prevention Month. Debt is a leading cause of suicide. Debt help is available. Debt free. Debt freedom. Debt snowball. IRS debt. Depression and mental health. #wealthyaccountant #debt #suicide #suicideawareness #suicideprevention #debtsnowball #debtfree #irsdebt #depressionPeople suffer for many reasons. Usually we can keep the demons under control. But everyone has a breaking point. Push hard enough far enough and the darkness wins. You can’t step back from the darkness alone. It is like a black hole with infinite power to draw you in.  If you ever reach that point, pray someone with the courage and the heart grabs you from behind and pulls you to safety.  No matter how much money you have or don’t have will make no difference.

The gun in Katie’s hands didn’t ask about her financial situation. The one bout of depression she had took control and changed her life forever. It is nothing short of a miracle she didn’t die that fateful day. Her family never left her side as she fought and still fights for life. The doctors worked miracles and have never stopped working to give Katie the life she deserves.

The only way any of us are safe from the darkness is if we all are committed to helping anyone at the brink. It is the only thing that makes us human; the true meaning of wealth; what it means to truly be financially independent.

 

Please, if you are suffering depression or suicidal thoughts, call either a local crisis hot line or the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255). The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is available 24/7, is confidential and free.

 

You are not in this alone.

 

1 National Geographic Magazine, September 2018, Page 89

2 Financial Independence/Early Retirement

 

Resources

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline

Call 1-800-273-8255

Crisis Text Line — Text HOME to 741741

American Foundation for Suicide Prevention

Project Semicolon

CNQR

Open Path Collective — affordable therapy. You can also check your local college to see if their graduate program in counseling offers discounted sessions.

Debtors Anonymous

 

More Wealth Building Resources

Personal Capital is an incredible tool to manage all your investments in one place. You can watch your net worth grow as you reach toward financial independence and beyond. Did I mention Personal Capital is free?

Side Hustle Selling tradelines yields a high return compared to time invested, as much as $1,000 per hour. The tradeline company I use is Tradeline Supply Company. Let Darren know you are from The Wealthy Accountant. Call 888-844-8910, email Darren@TradelineSupply.com or read my review.

Medi-Share is a low cost way to manage health care costs. As health insurance premiums continue to sky rocket, there is an alternative preserving the wealth of families all over America. Here is my review of Medi-Share and additional resources to bring health care under control in your household.

QuickBooks is a daily part of life in my office. Managing a business requires accurate books without wasting time. QuickBooks is an excellent tool for managing your business, rental properties, side hustle and personal finances.

A cost segregation study can save $100,000 for income property owners. Here is my review of how cost segregation studies work and how to get one yourself.

Worthy Financial offers a flat 5% on their investment. You can read my review here. 

Note: Today we have a short guest post from Lucille Rosetti. Her blog, The Bereaved, is an excellent resource for people struggling with elderly parents and family or friends suffering illness or struggling with old age or the loss of a loved one. She also has a book on the subject: Life After Death: A Wellness Guide for the BereavedThe financial ramifications are significant. The best laid financial plan is straw in the wind when age and illness enter the scene. Please consider Lucille’s message.

 

How To Help A Senior Loved One With Financial And Legal Decisions

 

When a senior loses a spouse, their lives change dramatically. No longer do they have a partner to help make major decisions; not only that, they also have to make hard choices about their finances and lifestyle during a period of grief. It can be physically and emotionally draining, which can take a toll after a while. That’s why it’s so important to help your loved one emotionally and with both financial and legal decisions that could affect them for years to come.

Caring for an elder loved one is one of the most difficult challenges in life. An elderly parent frequently needs help with financial and legal issues. #eldercare #lovedones #estateplanning #legal

Photo via Pixabay by Longleanna (Artwork by The Wealthy Accountant)

Not only will your loved one need help planning for the funeral and other services, they need assistance with small things, like grocery shopping and paying bills on time. The loss of a spouse is a major blow that can lead to depression, stress, and anxiety, and few people have the capacity to think about the details during such a trying time. It’s also important for you to help them figure out their legal needs, such as creating a will, naming an executor of their estate, handing over power of attorney, and naming a health care surrogate.

Keep reading for more information on how to help your senior loved one manage financial and legal decisions after the loss of a spouse.

Take Care of the Most Pressing Matters First

While there’s certainly a lot to think about after losing a spouse, it’s important for your loved one to only take care of the most pressing matters first. There just isn’t room to carry grief, worries about the future, and attention to detail at the same time, so make sure they handle the most important things before sweating the small stuff. This means paying the mortgage and other bills that are due immediately, taking care of the deceased’s life insurance policy, and handling the funeral. Just about everything else can wait.

Obtain an Advance Directive

An advance directive is a legal document that names specific people as a durable power of attorney, a health-care surrogate, or an executor of the estate. It’s important for your loved one to have these documents — along with a living will — so that someone will be responsible for overseeing applications for Medicare or long-term healthcare, selling real estate, and accessing medical info and retirement benefits on behalf of your loved one. This will help your loved one in the long-term and will ensure that when they pass, there will be no lengthy, stressful legal battles over property, finances, or medical care.

Advise Them Not to Make Rash Decisions

One of the worst things a senior can do after losing a spouse is a rushed decision to sell the house. While they may want to downsize to save money or to have less to take care of, it’s best to make sure the market isn’t flat first; this will prevent their home from sitting on the market too long. They may not have the funds to keep paying the mortgage on their current home and make a move into something smaller simultaneously, so timing is important.

Watch Closely for Signs of Depression

After losing a loved one, many seniors find their grief never dissipates. They may feel sad and lonely much of the time, which can lead to depression, substance abuse, and even suicidal thoughts. Watch closely for symptoms of these issues, which may include withdrawing from friends and family, not eating well, sleeping too much or too little, and losing or gaining a lot of weight in a short period of time.

Helping a senior loved one make such big decisions is never easy, but it’s important to find ways to protect their best interests during such a hard time. With a good plan and a little research, you can make sure your loved one is well taken care of even during the darkest of times.

 

More Wealth Building Resources

Personal Capital is an incredible tool to manage all your investments in one place. You can watch your net worth grow as you reach toward financial independence and beyond. Did I mention Personal Capital is free?

Side Hustle Selling tradelines yields a high return compared to time invested, as much as $1,000 per hour. The tradeline company I use is Tradeline Supply Company. Let Darren know you are from The Wealthy Accountant. Call 888-844-8910, email Darren@TradelineSupply.com or read my review.

Medi-Share is a low cost way to manage health care costs. As health insurance premiums continue to sky rocket, there is an alternative preserving the wealth of families all over America. Here is my review of Medi-Share and additional resources to bring health care under control in your household.

QuickBooks is a daily part of life in my office. Managing a business requires accurate books without wasting time. QuickBooks is an excellent tool for managing your business, rental properties, side hustle and personal finances.

A cost segregation study can save $100,000 for income property owners. Here is my review of how cost segregation studies work and how to get one yourself.

Worthy Financial offers a flat 5% on their investment. You can read my review here.