Tag

spending

Credit Cards, Lifestyle

Manufactured Spending Without the Factory

Start your rewards card search here.

The biggest problem most people have with credit card bonus programs is meeting the spending requirements for the bonus. Business owners have an advantage. Landlords do too. Meeting a $3,000 spending requirement in 90 days is a snap of the finger for even a relatively small business or side gig.

But not every side gig has enough spending that can go on a credit card and if you only own a few rental properties and maintenance is not currently required you will need another source of spending to earn a bonus.

Readers of this blog tend toward the frugal side. Spending for the sake of spending for a bonus is crazy and you guys know it. Your personal spending is probably too low to earn many bonus cash awards or miles. Travel hacking gets harder when you save most of your income.

Manufactured spending is the solution bandied around the blogosphere. It sounds so simple at first. Find a source where you can recycle fake spending into cash and miles rewards. Well, how do you do that?




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Taxes and Investing

The Sweet Spot of Non-Cash Deductions

There is an old Looney Tunes cartoon where Daffy Duck is portraying Sherlock Holmes. Daffy is seated at a desk stacked with papers vigorously working the calculator. Porky Pig, portraying Watson, walks in and asks, “Whatever are you doing, Holmes.” “Deducting, my dear Watson. Deducting,” came the frantic reply.

Deductions come in a variety of flavors. We are all familiar with deductions matched with an expense. Donations to charity are deductible on Schedule A. Business owners deduct marketing expenses dollar for dollar.

There is another elusive deduction taxpayers only dream about: the non-cash deduction. The appeal of the non-cash deduction is the large write-off without a matching real world expense. Capitalizing on non-cash deductions can supercharge your retirement or debt reduction plans. The list of non-cash deductions is long. We will explore several ways you can reduce your taxes without spending a penny or taking a deduction significantly higher than the actual expense and stay out of jail in the process.




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Early Retirement, Frugal Living, Lifestyle

Spending versus Cash Flow Meets the Debt Bomb

“It’s not working.”

A long time client started reading this blog and subscribed wholeheartedly into the idea of saving half her income. She discovered the blog early so she had nearly a year of effort under her belt. Student loans were the worst part of her debt, but credit cards and a mortgage also weighed heavily on her financial plan.

Saving half your income is the floor, not the ceiling. In this case, my client and her husband earn nearly $100,000 a year. They wanted to cut their spending to my levels using my yardsticks for spending. They are down to the mid 40s, a very good sign. The lament, however, has me concerned.

The only way this works is to be consistent. Years of hard work can be destroyed by a short-term spending binge. A new expensive car, a cottage up north, a trip to the casino and a new set of furniture can all be spent in a single month. The penalty will take years to fix.





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Frugal Living, Lifestyle

Frugality the Right Way

My last blog post was a disaster. In an attempt to gain some breathing room I accepted my first guest post without proper vetting. An astute reader quickly realized the guest was promoting a debt consolidation service. I should have known better.

My reasoning was sound; execution needed work. Tax season is getting long in the tooth and I am exhausted from the long hours. Hoping to divert some time from writing to tax work, I allowed the enemy behind the lines. My promise to you, kind readers, is to up my game. I like the idea of guest posts, but I think it would be best if I invited bloggers I know and trust to do the writing.

That said, I have no intentions of reducing my writing output. You come here to listen to my stories and glean my words for valuable advice you can take back home.

Success is a poor educator. When things are going good—and life has been very good to me—I/we start to believe we are smarter than we really are. It takes a solid kick to the crotch to focus attention. As bad as the last post was, a lesson was to be learned you are not aware of: my traffic was rather good! For a terrible guest post I had a high level of traffic. I take that to mean people were attracted to the title: frugality. I decided I should write the guest post intended for you.Continue reading

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Early Retirement, Frugal Living, Lifestyle

Kill the Economy and You Will Not Even Notice

It does not take long when you wander the blogs of the ‘retire early’ community before you hear the common refrain: If everybody did this stuff it would kill the economy. To which I promptly call bullshit.

Bill Gates and Warren Buffett managed to not spend over $100 billion of their money over the last few decades and the economy has done fine. In the 1950s the savings rate was much higher and the economy more vibrant. When the research is reviewed there is no doubt excessive debt, a low savings rate and excessive spending have more to do with an anemic economy than any responsible spending will do.

People look for any excuse they can to remain married to their poor habits and lack of self-control. It is easier to complain about successful people than it is to take responsibility for your own actions. Somehow these people have been bullshitted for so long they actually think poverty is the only way to keep the economy going. Really? They think the only way to survive is to spend every nickel they have. They think living on the financial edge of ruin from the first light breeze is what makes the economy purr and provides job security. Where does this nonsense come from?Continue reading

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Early Retirement, Lifestyle, Taxes and Investing

Financial Independence for Normal People

51efot8iakl-_sx324_bo1204203200_Discussions around here have focused on early retirement and financial independence with a few assumptions: either you own income properties, own a business, or have a side hustle. But what about the other 95% of the people working their tail off, day in and day out, looking for a retirement plan? For those fine folks I have a treat today. We will focus on normal people and wealth accumulation. We will avoid tax talk because income level and type of income create too many variables muddying the conversation.

You would think it should be simple if you are a wage earner only, but it’s not. There are several choices you need to make to maximize your wealthy building. Accelerating to the early retirement line is straight forward if you know where to start. Without passive income like rental properties you only have your earned income (wages) to rely on. Your passive income will be limited to dividends, interest and capital gains.

Building an Empire

There are two parts to living the Financial Independence (FI) lifestyle: the building phase and the maintaining phase. During the building phase you save like crazy. My recommendation is to save half of what you earn. It is more important than ever to have a high savings rate if you don’t own rental properties or have a side hustle. It will take 16-17 years to reach FI at a 50% savings rate assuming a 5% growth rate and a 4% withdrawal rate once retired.


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Credit Cards, Lifestyle, Small Business, Taxes and Investing

Get Paid to Take a Vacation

frog-897418_960_720Mrs. Accountant and I recently went on a business trip. Like most business trips we invested time, but no money. The trip was better than free; we came home with more money than we started with and did nothing crazy like house-sitting or couch surfing. We enjoyed meals at excellent restaurants and slept in 3 and 4 star hotels every night. We drove in this instance because we like seeing the sites as we go. In all it took three weeks to complete the business trip. It was a great time for Mrs. Accountant and me to spend quality time together without interruption.

There are a million ways to travel for free. Many people in early retirement dream of doing so. But what about the rest of us? You might not be retired. And then there is the unique breed of animal called the business owner. I fall into the last group.

Traveling is something I avoid. Life on the road is not something I look forward to. As I get older I find myself on the road more and more for longer periods of time for business. Now you know why Mrs. Accountant works for my company.

The reason for the trip is not important. What is important is how I accomplished the feat of three weeks of travel and got paid to do so. Actually, three entities paid for our trip: the organization I was asked to speak for, the bank, and the government. The government paid the largest portion of the bill and it was all legal.

Speaking engagements are the biggest reason for time away from home now. Training conferences are second. Many conferences extend over a long weekend, four days in this instance. The four days at the conference were covered: meals and lodging. Personal entertainment and travel were my own.


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Early Retirement, Lifestyle

I’ll Tell You Why You’re a Failure




8226451812_88007f08df_bBuying a car is like marriage to me; it is until death do us part. So far she has been the one dying and I remain to keep the memories alive. In 2009 I bought a 2007 Toyota Camry from the local credit union to help them clean up a bad loan. I have never had serious problems, but periodically I have to invest a bit into the vehicle so the ‘ol girl makes it to 20. The Camry had one of those days.

The exhaust pipe broke near the head next to the catalytic. The metal was too thin to weld so replacement was the only option. My neighbor across the road (how convenient living out in the country), Roger, has a lift in his garage and handles most minor repairs for me. I still change the oil so I can brag this accountant gets his hands dirty now and again.

The replacement part had the cat in it so it wasn’t going to be cheap. I went over the O’Reilly Auto Parts for the replacement. It set me back $184. Roger charged me $25 to change it. I knew it was going to be a bit more than a simple muffler repair. When I picked up the section of exhaust pipe the kindly clerk asked me if I was a member of their rewards club. I said I was now. It works like this: for every $150 you spend they send you a $5 coupon for a future purchase.Continue reading

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