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management

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Crowdsourcing Experience

There are advantages to writing a personal finance blog that go beyond the love of writing and meeting new people. Few things in life bring as much pleasure as sharing knowledge gleaned over decades of experience. Stories are the best. Sharing stories with friends is a time honored pleasure handed down to us through countless generations.

The old adage about the teacher learning more than the student applies in blog writing as well as in formalized education settings. Additional research and looking at a situation considering perspectives wider than just your own is an eye opening experience.

The constant search for a story idea and angle is hard, yet rewarding, work. Topics I would never think of digging deeper into eventually reach the front burner. Unexpected paths are taken. I always have a plan. It never ends up the way I anticipate. Stories have a habit of taking on a life of their own. (At least I started with good intentions.)




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Investment Commercial Real Estate Profits and Pitfalls

Residential investment property is forgiving for the most part. Professional managers exist in most markets and except for the very worst of conditions it is possible to fill most apartments even if it is not at a profitable rate.

The number of residential properties available is large and unloading a single family home or duplex is fairly quick and simple. Many economists consider a six month supply of homes on the market a healthy balanced market.

Things get slightly less forgiving when you graduate to multi-unit apartment complexes. There are fewer to select from, they cost significantly more, there are more tenants to manage and it usually takes longer to sell the more expensive buildings. Not as many investors can swing a multi-million dollar deal or even finance one.

It might not be intuitive, but the more expensive the property the more likely it will be purchased as a cash deal. Big buildings carry big responsibilities and risks, but also are coupled with larger rewards.

Generally the rules are straightforward with residential rental properties. Lease contracts are generally standardized in most states and the landlord/tenant rules are clearly defined. The laws tend to protect the tenant more than the landlord. Still, the landlord, if she bought right, should turn a tidy profit.

Real estate investors usually start small, a single family rental or duplex, moving up to multi-unit buildings later. Most landlords stop at the duplex level with maybe a 4-plex or so tossed in for good measure.

The next leap takes courage. Financing a large deal is more difficult. Only a select number of banks are willing to fund a seven figure project. You need good credit, experience and a documented plan. At the end of the day the multi-unit complex is still a forgiving animal in the real estate world.

Then there is the commercial property.




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The Right Way to Own Investment Properties




During the 1980s and 90s I owned a lot of real estate. It started slow and exploded into a 176 building pain in the ass. To be fair, most of the investment properties we owned were either single family homes or duplexes. A few multi-family buildings, a boarding house and a storage facility rounded out the mix.

With so many properties running through my personal accounts and a partnership with dad and brother, I learned a few things along the way. One hundred seventy six buildings is a lot of buildings. Good thing I didn’t own all of them at the same time. Mistakes were sure to happen.

By the early 2000s the real estate empire was gone. I was burnt out and sick of working with tenants. Countless property managers helped us over the years, but it was not enough. Managing over a hundred units much of the time over a footprint covering most of NE Wisconsin took its toll. To complicate matters, I also ran my accounting practice with double the employees I have today (during tax season).

Starting slow was my greatest idea. It felt good to see the passive income filling the checkbook. Our teams of contractors allowed us to buy fixer-uppers and increase the property values significantly. Our best deal was the purchase of an upper-lower duplex in my hometown for $8,000. Hard not to make a profit on those.Continue reading

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Organize Your Life to Maximize Net Worth and Minimize Taxes

JD Roth

I had the awesome opportunity of meeting JD Roth! While not fast buddies, I look forward to meeting JD in the future. He is even better in real life than I imagined.

The following post is based on a presentation I gave at Camp Mustache SE in Gainesville, Florida on January 15, 2017.

There are several ways to convince someone to speak at your event. Stephen Baughier used the most sure-fire method ever. Stephen noticed I wrote a blog post back in August listing some people I would like to meet someday. He checked two people on the list and found JD Roth open to attending. He then called me and said, “Hey, Keith. I saw on your blog you wanted to meet JD Roth. Well, he is speaking at Camp Mustache SE in January. We would love to have you speak as well and you can meet a man you admire.” How could I say no?

Picking a topic of discussion is something I allow the event organizer to decide. If they have no preference I choose something currently exciting to me. In this instance Stephen thought something about organizing your stuff in preparation for meeting your accountant/tax guy would be a good choice.

I grimaced. My organizational skills are not legend. However, I do keep a tight fist on in financial organization.

Bookkeeping is not a topic which lends to filling an hour presentation. My first thought was to stand in front of the group and yell, “Shut up, and sit down!” while I stabbed my finger at them. “Enter your paperwork once a week and stop bitching about it.” Then I would grab a beer from the fridge and sit down. My first inclination had a slight flaw I thought might turn off the crowd and upset Stephen so I moved to plan B.Continue reading

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Making the List

396px-a_list_of_the_names_of_all_the_adventurers_in_the_stock_of_the_honourable_the_east_india_company_the_12th_day_of_april_1684A reader of The Wealthy Accountant recently offered me lunch. I have a weakness when it comes to food. Offer me a free meal and I am virtually a prostitute.

I accepted the offer of lunch for three reasons: 1. He is a local reader; 2. He asked nicely; 3. He wanted to discuss quitting his current job and starting a bookkeeping business as a side hustle. The last point is what got me. A local guy who wants to do bookkeeping is also a guy I might build a strategic alliance with to handle some of my bookkeeping work.

As we talked I shared stories like I do here. Eventually I got to a story I like to tell a lot, but failed to mention on this blog so far. I am not sure where to fit it in, but the story is so powerful it needs sharing. So I decided a story about making a list would be perfect for the Christmas holiday.


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Permanent Interest Free Loans

debt-1Credit cards were always a powerful cash management tool for business owners. Individuals can harness the same power, but frequently use credit cards wrong, piling on high interest debt, and suffering financially. In times past, credit cards allowed for easy payment and tracking of expenses. As banks grew more competitive, the opportunities also grew. Most people are familiar with cash-back and bonus offers when opening a new credit card, but there is so much more.

There is a whole additional universe of value available from credit cards missed because it is buried in fine print. In this post we will focus on one of those benefits: interest free loans. Tomorrow I will focus on the litany of advantages you can use to make your life simpler.

Interest free loans from credit cards are not for everyone. I will focus on three groups who should find value in the strategy I will soon outline. The three groups are: people digging out of debt, people interested in accelerating their investments in index funds, and individuals and business with seasonal revenue.


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Workflow in a Tax Office

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Workflow system.

The more traffic grows on The Wealthy Account the more questions I get from accountants wanting to know how to run their office more efficiently. The tips below can be tweaked to work in many business settings and can be applied to personal management of time with family and friends while allowing ample “me” time for reading, thinking, and relaxing.

The workflow process in my office evolved over time as the tax industry changed and my practice transformed from a tax office to an accounting/payroll/bookkeeping office to its current incarnation as a quasi-communications company focusing on tax issues. So you understand my thought process I will walk through how I handled workflow in the past and why I changed procedures when I did. By seeing each stage of my workflow history you can pull the pieces that fit your situation best and modify them for your needs.

In the Beginning. . .

Organization in a tax office is not optional. From day one workflow had to be recorded and tracked. In business and even in our personal lives it is important to write things down. We start each client with a line item on a legal sized piece of paper. Since there are so many steps we take with our clients we break down each task into its components. Accountants track their own work and the computer monitors progress. My front desk is used as a redundant system, preventing mistakes. An empty checkbox on the legal paper requires investigation.

Before workflow even enters the office, client flow must be managed. In your personal life you can’t visit 38 different friends in different locations at the same time. The same applies in business; you see one client at a time. The early years of my business grew fast. People would frequently drop in without an appointment. Then one year in early February there was a line out of my building and half way down the parking lot. Something had to be done.


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American Dream: Interviews with Industry-Leading Professionals




51dnv9taxjlI received an ARC from Jason Navallo, author of American Dream: Interviews with Industry-Leading Professionals. As I suspect with most personal financial bloggers, I get an above average number of requests to review books in advance. Most get put to the side for a later reading, if I get to them at all. American Dream caught my eye because Navello asked politely if I would review the book and he provided a small amount of background in the initial email.

What intrigued me from the beginning is the interview format with six very successful professionals from a variety of unrelated fields. I am a sucker for success stories so I made time to read the book. It blew my mind! American Dream is not a long book which is a good thing because I could not put it down. Navallo used a simple format with each professional. He started by asking each professional interviewed to providing some background on their early life and how they came to lead in the industry they are in. Depending on the path the interview took, he would explore unique characteristics to each professional’s path to success. He ended each interview by asking about their belief in the Power of Attraction, favorite quotes, favorite books, best lesson in life, the key to success, and if they believed the American Dream was dead. The answers surprised me.Continue reading

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