Tag

financial independence

Early Retirement, Lifestyle, Taxes and Investing

Financial Independence for Normal People

51efot8iakl-_sx324_bo1204203200_Discussions around here have focused on early retirement and financial independence with a few assumptions: either you own income properties, own a business, or have a side hustle. But what about the other 95% of the people working their tail off, day in and day out, looking for a retirement plan? For those fine folks I have a treat today. We will focus on normal people and wealth accumulation. We will avoid tax talk because income level and type of income create too many variables muddying the conversation.

You would think it should be simple if you are a wage earner only, but it’s not. There are several choices you need to make to maximize your wealthy building. Accelerating to the early retirement line is straight forward if you know where to start. Without passive income like rental properties you only have your earned income (wages) to rely on. Your passive income will be limited to dividends, interest and capital gains.

Building an Empire

There are two parts to living the Financial Independence (FI) lifestyle: the building phase and the maintaining phase. During the building phase you save like crazy. My recommendation is to save half of what you earn. It is more important than ever to have a high savings rate if you don’t own rental properties or have a side hustle. It will take 16-17 years to reach FI at a 50% savings rate assuming a 5% growth rate and a 4% withdrawal rate once retired.


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2016 Review; 2017 Plans for The Wealthy Accountant

statistics-706384_960_720Well, the first year is in the books. The Wealthy Accountant came to life on January 15th, 2016 in anticipation of a shout-out by Mr. Money Mustache. The project was on the drawing board for years, however, the workload caused me to drag my feet. But when I start I am all in.

This isn’t the first blog I’ve run, nor is it the only one I write at this time. Running a blog is work and something I held back on because I knew once I started writing this blog it would take over my life. But here I am and I am feeling good.

Other people writing a blog and curious readers are usually interested in statistics. The growth pattern of The Wealthy Accountant is taking a different path from other online venues I used. For example, the website of my tax practice has low traffic and no ad revenue. Just about every visitor of http://taxprepusa.net/ wants to be a client of my firm so we don’t want hundreds of thousands of visitors.

Then there is a content farm I wrote a hundred or so articles for years ago. After Google slapped the funny off the faces of content farm writers I moved my writing elsewhere. Still, HubPages sent me $439.93 in 2016 on 87,719 pageviews. Not bad for not doing a thing on HubPages in five years.


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Lifestyle

Sex, Porn and Addiction: The Killers of Financial Independence

586746403_1280x719Goodwill Industries of North Central Wisconsin provides a multitude of services to the poor in my community. Everything from help with medical, job search services, to the iconic Goodwill thrift store are there to benefit the poor. Another program is the Financial Information and Service Center, otherwise known as FISC. FISC provides personalized counseling in financial matters: bankruptcy, student loans, budgeting, credit card debt, and delinquent taxes.

Every year FISC calls me in to speak to their group. Counselors from around Wisconsin come to hear my message. Sometimes it is an informal presentation more along the lines of an inquisition (Q&A session). Other times we fill a large room and food is catered. A few of the counselors are clients as a result.

The FISC counselors are not tax professionals or even trained in tax matters. For their worst cases they refer their client to my firm. And so it was this past week. A man in his mid 30s had serious tax problems. When no one else can help there is always me. I take a limited number of impossible cases each year. These people have limited funds for my services so I charge a very low fee or just do it pro bono.


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Black Pride Meets White Privilege

text-1442218_960_720There is something wrong with this community. I couldn’t put my finger on it at first. My experiences and worldview didn’t allow me to see the problem. Then it hit me. The personal finance conferences I attend and even the readers of this blog are predominantly white. I felt the issue was so huge I had to write about encouraging minorities, especially the black community, to join our group. Fearful I might come across as a dick, I delayed and delayed. I started writing this post and then threw it away. It was all wrong. How can a white guy from a very white community reach out to the black community?

Then I got the wake up call. I published Overreacting Solves Nothing, where I attempt to calm the crowd after Trump won the election. A few days ago I was called out by a reader. SKG writes, “Easy for you to say not to overreact, you’re white. It’s a whole different story for people of color.” The gauntlet has been tossed and at the risk of coming across as a dick I have to reach out to this massive group of people filled with great pride in their heritage.

As white as the community I live in is, I still have a few black clients. I don’t call them black either; I call them clients. There are more Hispanic people in my community and, as a result, I have more Hispanic clients. Minorities never bothered me. My biggest problem with non-white clients is that sometimes I can’t understand them. Most Hispanics speak English just fine, but some have a strong dialect which I have to concentrate on to understand. When they see me struggle they revert to using Hispanic words because it is clearer for them.


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Gaming the Earned Income Credit

The best opportunities in the tax code are not found in the book. Today I am going to show you how to game the Earned Income Credit (EIC) legally in a way you have never heard before. I know most readers on this blog have an income in the six figures and higher. The example I illustrate today is geared toward families with an income of $100,000 or less. Even if your income is higher you want to stick around. What I show here exposes the way I think about taxes and how I use the tax code to save my clients massive quantities of money.

The EIC has a history of fraud. Because of this the IRS watches tax returns with the EIC closely for fraud. You guys are not at risk of IRS scrutiny because you are not going to commit fraud. Right? Good. The program I outline below does not require cheating to ramp up your available tax credits. No fake income or expenses are required. We will do this all above board for everyone to see. The IRS will bless your tax return for its accuracy.

The EIC is meant to help poor families, but the credit extends all the way to $50,597 for a married couple with two children in 2017. Our example below will use this family unit to illustrate the tax benefits. When we are done you will know how to collect the EIC even if your wage income is over $80,000, or even a bit higher!


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Year-End Tax Planning 2016




imagesThe end of the year is fast approaching. Time is running out to modify your finances to optimize tax savings. I will run down the more common ideas to reduce taxes. Keep in mind this is not a comprehensive review. Your facts and circumstances will determine what is best for you. Use this review as a guide to reduce your tax liability.

Investments

Most readers here have significant investments so we will start there. All adjustments to investments should have an economic reason beyond taxes. Reducing taxes is the goal, but the increased costs of selling can offset a portion or all of the benefit.

If you are not using an automatic tax loss harvesting program such as Betterment, now is the time to review your non-qualified (non retirement) portfolio. Mutual funds and stocks with losses can reduce the capital gains distributions of other mutual funds or ETFs. You can also report up to a $3,000 loss against other income on your federal return. Your state taxes will differ. In Wisconsin, for example, the loss against other income is limited to $500.Continue reading

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Why Keep Working?




img_20161103_233136It had to happen sometime and now was that time. As soon as traffic reached a certain level someone would finally say what was on everyone’s mind: Why are you doing it, Mr. Accountant? If you are so damn rich, why do you bust your ass running a tax practice and writing more copy than Stephen King on meth? The answer seems so simple to me, but I have seen this sickness before.

My buddy, Pete, over at Mr. Money Mustache faced similar comments in the past. Now that the guy publishes around two times a month no one is talking, but they all wish he did write more. (Way to go guys!) Recent comments on The Wealthy Accountant have now touched on the subject. The comments are very polite and not derogatory by any means. That is not always the case. The comment in question casts doubt on all personal finance bloggers claiming to have made it. There was doubt the bloggers are really retired. Between the lines you can read “the blogger needs the blog to pay bills”. There were also a few comments protesting the need for a side hustle. I want to set the record straight.

I have no problem as apologist for the “retire early” community of bloggers. I have met many of these fine people and find them to be genuine. There is no fraud, folks. You don’t go into blogging for the money! First you spend a year or more writing your tail off and then only a microscopic number actually turn a profit or any revenue at all. Even fewer make real money. Real world, dear readers. The people writing these blogs are doing it to share their experiences. No more. If it doesn’t hit big it does not mean back to the cubicle; it means, see ya in Tahiti. They are really retired and travel the hell out of the planet.Continue reading

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Hidden Value in Homeowners Insurance

img_20161031_201350Insurance is for the mathematically challenged. Insurance companies have the largest buildings in town for a reason. What other company do you write a check to for a thousand dollars and get nothing more than a promise to cover some bills in the event of certain losses? Commissions to the salesperson can reach or exceed 100% of premiums in the early years of some life insurance policies. Many credit card companies offer free extended warranty insurance at no additional cost when you buy with their card. You can guess the real value of the extended warrantee offered at Wal-Mart on $88 headphones.

Warren Buffett built an empire funded by insurance premiums at Geico. Some insurance is required by law. In the U.S., auto insurance is required for liability. Health insurance is also required since the Affordable Care Act passed.

Insurance is about risk management. Insurance companies are masters at it. The goal for the insurance company is to bring in as much as possible in premiums and pay out as little as possible in claims. Insurance always has a built-in profit for the insurance company. This is the house advantage.

Most insurance claims are for stupid small stuff. The cost of insurance to cover claims under $10,000 is massive. The processing of a claim is expensive. That is why higher deductible can save so much. But even better is not buying insurance at all and pocketing the cash.


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