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Small Business

Lifestyle, Small Business, Taxes and Investing

Treat Taxes Like a Game

staunton_chess_setLife in the accounting business can be difficult at times. Clients are as close to friends as you can get without actually being friends. You know all the details of their private lives. I know a divorce is imminent many times before the spouse does. I get details on illnesses in the family. I have to. Part of the tax preparation process is to know your client. When you ask about medical expenses you get the details too. In Wisconsin we have a deduction for certain private school tuition. When I ask about the kids I get the low-down on little Billy. And I don’t mind one bit. I care about my clients so I listen and interact. The line between client and friend is thin indeed.

That is why it bothers me when I can’t communicate a message to a client. Try as I may, some clients could care less about their taxes. They are willing to overpay their taxes to get out of all the reporting. They don’t understand the amount of money left on the table.

A few weeks ago I emailed a client reminding them to verify their retirement contributions and to provide a log for business miles and business overnight stays. To be honest, I didn’t expect a response. They are awesome clients and I love’em to death, but they just don’t engage at the level I would like and it bothers me because it is costing them dearly.


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Expand Your Business and Increase Margins with Outsourcing




outsourcingStarting a business is an act of love and courage. Enjoying a task soon becomes a business. You might start working out of the home or buy a small store front. The previous hobby now commands more of your precious time. A business is about more than making money. Small business owners love the work they do and get paid to do it. Awesome! Then reality sets in.

When I was a sophomore in high school I fell in love with the stock market crash of 1929. The teacher said economists don’t know what really caused the crash. The Smoot-Hawley Tariff was probably the trigger but many other events also played a role. I could not let it go. Every book in the school and public library in my small town was in my paw, devoured for any tidbit of information on why things went so wrong in 1929. I never found a definitive answer, but I did learn a lot about economics.

And the stock market. From that point on I wanted to be a stockbroker. When I was in college I took a business class, accounting, and macro and micro economics. Though I never earned a degree I learned a lot that has helped me in my career. It gave me a start on where and what to study to get good at finance.Continue reading

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Supercharge Your Net Worth

img_20161009_152000Business ownership is the fastest way to significant net worth and financial independence (FI). It is possible to grow your net worth $2 or more for every dollar you increase your revenue. This is before investment gains! By understanding the accounting behind business valuation, anyone can accumulate a seven figure net worth in as few as five years which can be turned liquid and invested in income producing assets allowing for early retirement.

Building a massive net worth is more difficult, if not impossible, with earned income only. Mega-wealthy people like Warren Buffett and Bill Gates know wealth is created from multiplier effects. Buffett grew Berkshire Hathaway by investing in other successful companies and insurance. Bill Gates grew Microsoft into a world leading software company. In each case the majority of the wealth created, around twenty times the profit level, came from multipliers. Only about 5% of their wealth came from actual profits!

Average people can use the same methods as the uber-wealthy to supercharge their net worth. Business owners have the advantage. Wage earners have no multipliers to help them accelerate their net worth growth, whereas a business owner can increase her net worth by $2 or more for every dollar of increased revenue the business has even if she saves and invests none of the profits.


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Workflow in a Tax Office

img_20161027_090824

Workflow system.

The more traffic grows on The Wealthy Account the more questions I get from accountants wanting to know how to run their office more efficiently. The tips below can be tweaked to work in many business settings and can be applied to personal management of time with family and friends while allowing ample “me” time for reading, thinking, and relaxing.

The workflow process in my office evolved over time as the tax industry changed and my practice transformed from a tax office to an accounting/payroll/bookkeeping office to its current incarnation as a quasi-communications company focusing on tax issues. So you understand my thought process I will walk through how I handled workflow in the past and why I changed procedures when I did. By seeing each stage of my workflow history you can pull the pieces that fit your situation best and modify them for your needs.

In the Beginning. . .

Organization in a tax office is not optional. From day one workflow had to be recorded and tracked. In business and even in our personal lives it is important to write things down. We start each client with a line item on a legal sized piece of paper. Since there are so many steps we take with our clients we break down each task into its components. Accountants track their own work and the computer monitors progress. My front desk is used as a redundant system, preventing mistakes. An empty checkbox on the legal paper requires investigation.

Before workflow even enters the office, client flow must be managed. In your personal life you can’t visit 38 different friends in different locations at the same time. The same applies in business; you see one client at a time. The early years of my business grew fast. People would frequently drop in without an appointment. Then one year in early February there was a line out of my building and half way down the parking lot. Something had to be done.


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Working with the Wealthy Accountant




20160323_165144One of the occupational hazards of having a very public blog is demands from readers. I love hearing from all of you. Your ideas spark me into action, looking for new ways to manage and reduce tax bills. The downside is all the time required handling requests for personal help. Normally a simple answer would suffice, but when people have a tax question it takes time to flesh out an accurate answer. There are just too many emails to answer them all. It bothers me immensely. So I will initiate a new procedure to help maximize the number of people I can serve adequately.

Anyone is welcome to contact me. Understand if I don’t respond, it is due to an overload of requests. Readers contacting me for help either want tax preparation services or consulting; consulting is the largest request. I block four hours per work day for consulting with clients. This includes research time and review of client documents.

Returning phone calls is a huge sinkhole of time; I only get through about 20% of the time. I’ve resorted to sending return emails requesting the reader to contact my office and schedule an appointment along with my consulting fees. I started that process a few weeks ago and got only a small response back.

With that in mind I want to outline how I will handle this extra workflow. Rather than readers sending me long emails and asking for my fee, how about I give you my consulting fee here and let you decide if it is worth it before you contact me.

My consulting fee is simple: $(to be updates soon) per hour with a one hour minimum.

If you are good with that, feel free to contact me. You can also contact me to prepare your tax return or if you want me to consider you for a Reader Case Study, which I will start doing on this blog as we approach the 2017 tax season.

Tax returns will still need a quote and I have added staff and opened several slots for new tax returns. Depending on the size of the tax returns coming in, my guess is we will accept around 100 new clients in 2017. This is a small number compared to the volume of requests, but a large investment of time as most readers contacting me have a multitude of issues.

The consulting fee is low so I anticipate a reasonable number of requests. I am also opening up slowly to American ex-pats on a limited basis. We will help catch up back tax returns, too.

My goal is to provide better service in a timely manner to more people. The massive transformation at Tax Prep & Accounting Services, Inc. has stretched my management skills. I needed the kick in the pants. It was time to up my game.

If you emailed me in the past without a response, feel free to do so again. I look forward to working with you.

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My Daughter Retired at 22 — Here is How She Did It

img_20161018_075051For five years I played treasurer at the Wisconsin Writers Association (WWA). The annual conference is their big event. Every year great minds gathered to share ideas writers could use to write better and promote their work. I always tried to snag a spot for a presentation on promotion for writers.

WWA is a small writers association. Only a small portion of the members are actually published, not including self-published books. I had tons of ideas for those few who did have a book in print and in bookstores. When it comes to promoting a small business — and writing is a small business (which can get really big for some) — I have a massive arsenal.

Three years ago I presented at the WWA annual conference in Wisconsin Rapids. My idea for writers was simple. Stop doing book signings at bookstores and focus on libraries. A gasp rose from the crowd. Sacrilege! I had to explain when you are at a bookstore you have thousands of competitors an arm’s length away. It is common for an author at a bookstore signing to have fewer than five people buy their book; many times they sell none!

Libraries are different. Your competitors are available for checkout, but a signed copy is available only with purchase. Libraries are hungry for authors willing to speak to their patrons. Not only will you sell books, you will also get paid for the speaking engagement in most cases. Libraries are the unsung heroes for people looking to supercharge their writing career.

I went into more detail at the conference than I will here. I will chase to the end. During the 50 minute presentation I outlined how an author can earn six figures annually working ten or fewer hours per week. I was soundly admonished. Authors disagreed vehemently that this would work. I stood my ground. As the presentation came to an end a man in the back of the room raised his hand and said, “I am with the Door County Library system and what Keith has said is 100% true. We can’t get authors to show up even when we pay them. And when authors work with us they sell books and get paid for that too. We also sell the author’s book at wholesale price to patrons so the author sells even more books and gets more royalties.” I rest my case.

My oldest daughter, Heather, was in the audience that day. She is also the only one who took notes and followed through.

Play all Day

Heather is not a normal kid; she is a lot like her dad. She does not want to run a business like I do, but she isn’t excited about working for the man. She struggled with her true dream: art. The kid is talented, for sure, but so are another couple million people, too. Heather wanted to attend art schools around the planet and I refused to pay her way. I told her she doesn’t want to produce the same art everyone else is producing. Be different if you want to survive with art.


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Mister Indispensable: Everybody’s Go-to Guy




img_20161009_152000I am writing this as the tax extension deadline is a week away. Tax returns I delegated to my team are starting to boomerang back to my desk. Some issues are beyond the comprehension of everyone but me. This confuses me. How can I be so much smarter than everyone else? What makes me so special?

The first issue perplexing me is the Indispensable Man theory. It goes like this: I want to earn more money but I am unable to close the money accounts. As you can see it does not work. Avoiding the tough cases holds people back in their career. If the boss does the work you can’t claim credit for the project.

The second issue is that the Indispensable Man is only an illusion. There is no tiny bag of pixie dust hanging at my side I can use to fix any problem showing up. Okay, maybe I do. It’s called an absolute confidence I can figure anything out and get it done. I am not asked to perform brain surgery (and if I was I could do it given enough time to research the subject and consult with other professionals); I am asked to perform a task in my field of study. All the resources available to me are available to all tax professionals. Nothing special in my bag of tricks.

The Illusion

Once I started writing this blog the emails started pouring in. As you might expect, a large number were from people wanting personalized help, something I don’t have time for. Another common refrain comes from other tax professionals. They either want to know how to grow their practice or they work for a firm and want to strike out on their own, but are afraid to make the leap, worried they have no one to turn to with the tough cases.Continue reading

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The Acid of Arrogance




crow-741168_960_720There is a heaping plate of steaming crow on the kitchen table cooked especially for me. It all started a year and a half ago. After all these years in business, I was starting to feel my oats. I would brag about the list of clients I had put together. My tax practice was serving some very wealthy and well known people. A few rock bands were in the fold and even a board of director from a company connected to Warren Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway graced my client list. I had a sales pitch for anyone willing to listen.

Then a brainstorm hit. I would move to the next level by landing a business deal with an influential personal finance blogger. It went better than I ever expected. Instead of inking a collaboration, I got a collaboration and a client and a massive promotion for my tax practice. There was no doubt in my mind I could handle it. I lived through worse. And don’t think for a minute I didn’t let people know about it.

That was the moment I allowed arrogance to turn me into a dick. By biting off more than I could chew clients were left in the dust. It became impossible to respond to all the emails. Emails were not simple acknowledgements to read. Each had a long request requiring time to answer and respond to or I had to disregard them.Continue reading

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