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Early Retirement

Early Retirement, Lifestyle

Overreacting Solves Nothing




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Chicken Little and her children.

Chicken Little is in true form this week as the election in the States surprised many. The headlines this morning on CNBC echo and increasing level of alarm: Anti-Trump Portland Protest Turns Into a Riot; Op-Ed: I’m not worried about a US recession, I’m worried about another Great Depression; Trump’s enemies are already paying the price; Donald Trump tweets about unfair protests — then has second thoughts; An ‘ugly period’ for the market is drawing near: Saxo Bank economist.

I haven’t seen such overreacting since, well, I don’t know when. There is certainly a lot not to like about Trump, but overreacting will not make it better. The stock market is rallying on higher interest rates. Financials are doing well while much of the market is down. Overall we saw a nice rally and it might, or might not, be overdone. Over at CNBC again we hear: Cramer warns the rally is ‘getting out of hand’ —better deals found in the trash. Really! Yeah, the market will pull back at some point and there is no reason for stocks to be higher due to a guy winning an election who hasn’t even started his first day on the job.

Interest rates rising rapidly bear watching and could be a problem for housing and the economy as a whole, but as of now the SKY IS NOT FALLING! There are reasons for concern. Unless you are a white man there has been vitriol spewed toward you from the President-elect over the past few years.

Overreacting solves nothing. Rioting certainly doesn’t. Playing into the hand of violence never works. Taking a proactive approach is the only solution. The people most shocked are the ones who worked so hard campaigning for another candidate. I get it. I’ve worked hard for a long period to watch a project utterly fail. But it wasn’t the end. I learned a lot throughout the process. You need to focus your efforts, using what you learned to facilitate change.

People make America great. The guy with the second highest tally of votes won the Electoral College and the election. It isn’t the first time it has happened. And I bet you have experience working with people of less than the highest caliber. We all have. As frustrating as it can be at times, we need to engage our Stoic training. Complaining and whining is not allowed!Continue reading

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Reality Check: Calm in the Face of Panic




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Pinky could care less who won the election. She is happy with a clean litter box, a bowl of fresh food , and a scratch behind the ears.

It is 3:30 in the morning and I just discovered who our next president will be. I had a nice nap earlier, but tend to sleep in fits and starts which is great for quiet writing time in the middle of the night. I’ll probably take another nap later this morning so I will be awake and alert. Back to the election.

The news reports say the Canadian immigration website collapsed from the deluge of visitors. Stock markets are down around the planet, but from what I read it is better than what it was earlier. One newsfeed had pictures of crying Hillary Clinton fans. It seems like the world is ending for people who worked so hard for their candidate.

There will be pain in the weeks and months ahead. There would be pain in the weeks and months ahead regardless who won the election. This is reality. America is undertaking a grand experiment. It isn’t the first time we walked the road less traveled. My political position is unimportant, but I will share my vote so you understand I am not writing this from the victor’s side. I voted for Hillary and had my reasons. None of that matters now. Trump will be the next President of the United States.

The Root of Panic

There is plenty to be concerned with. An untested politician jumps straight to the top. What could go wrong? Well, lots can go wrong. But a lot is always going wrong. We lived through a Civil War, two world wars, victories and defeats. And life kept chugging along. Now is not the time to panic. (There is never a good time to panic.)Continue reading

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Why Keep Working?




img_20161103_233136It had to happen sometime and now was that time. As soon as traffic reached a certain level someone would finally say what was on everyone’s mind: Why are you doing it, Mr. Accountant? If you are so damn rich, why do you bust your ass running a tax practice and writing more copy than Stephen King on meth? The answer seems so simple to me, but I have seen this sickness before.

My buddy, Pete, over at Mr. Money Mustache faced similar comments in the past. Now that the guy publishes around two times a month no one is talking, but they all wish he did write more. (Way to go guys!) Recent comments on The Wealthy Accountant have now touched on the subject. The comments are very polite and not derogatory by any means. That is not always the case. The comment in question casts doubt on all personal finance bloggers claiming to have made it. There was doubt the bloggers are really retired. Between the lines you can read “the blogger needs the blog to pay bills”. There were also a few comments protesting the need for a side hustle. I want to set the record straight.

I have no problem as apologist for the “retire early” community of bloggers. I have met many of these fine people and find them to be genuine. There is no fraud, folks. You don’t go into blogging for the money! First you spend a year or more writing your tail off and then only a microscopic number actually turn a profit or any revenue at all. Even fewer make real money. Real world, dear readers. The people writing these blogs are doing it to share their experiences. No more. If it doesn’t hit big it does not mean back to the cubicle; it means, see ya in Tahiti. They are really retired and travel the hell out of the planet.Continue reading

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Hidden Value in Homeowners Insurance

img_20161031_201350Insurance is for the mathematically challenged. Insurance companies have the largest buildings in town for a reason. What other company do you write a check to for a thousand dollars and get nothing more than a promise to cover some bills in the event of certain losses? Commissions to the salesperson can reach or exceed 100% of premiums in the early years of some life insurance policies. Many credit card companies offer free extended warranty insurance at no additional cost when you buy with their card. You can guess the real value of the extended warrantee offered at Wal-Mart on $88 headphones.

Warren Buffett built an empire funded by insurance premiums at Geico. Some insurance is required by law. In the U.S., auto insurance is required for liability. Health insurance is also required since the Affordable Care Act passed.

Insurance is about risk management. Insurance companies are masters at it. The goal for the insurance company is to bring in as much as possible in premiums and pay out as little as possible in claims. Insurance always has a built-in profit for the insurance company. This is the house advantage.

Most insurance claims are for stupid small stuff. The cost of insurance to cover claims under $10,000 is massive. The processing of a claim is expensive. That is why higher deductible can save so much. But even better is not buying insurance at all and pocketing the cash.


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Supercharge Your Net Worth

img_20161009_152000Business ownership is the fastest way to significant net worth and financial independence (FI). It is possible to grow your net worth $2 or more for every dollar you increase your revenue. This is before investment gains! By understanding the accounting behind business valuation, anyone can accumulate a seven figure net worth in as few as five years which can be turned liquid and invested in income producing assets allowing for early retirement.

Building a massive net worth is more difficult, if not impossible, with earned income only. Mega-wealthy people like Warren Buffett and Bill Gates know wealth is created from multiplier effects. Buffett grew Berkshire Hathaway by investing in other successful companies and insurance. Bill Gates grew Microsoft into a world leading software company. In each case the majority of the wealth created, around twenty times the profit level, came from multipliers. Only about 5% of their wealth came from actual profits!

Average people can use the same methods as the uber-wealthy to supercharge their net worth. Business owners have the advantage. Wage earners have no multipliers to help them accelerate their net worth growth, whereas a business owner can increase her net worth by $2 or more for every dollar of increased revenue the business has even if she saves and invests none of the profits.


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My Daughter Retired at 22 — Here is How She Did It

img_20161018_075051For five years I played treasurer at the Wisconsin Writers Association (WWA). The annual conference is their big event. Every year great minds gathered to share ideas writers could use to write better and promote their work. I always tried to snag a spot for a presentation on promotion for writers.

WWA is a small writers association. Only a small portion of the members are actually published, not including self-published books. I had tons of ideas for those few who did have a book in print and in bookstores. When it comes to promoting a small business — and writing is a small business (which can get really big for some) — I have a massive arsenal.

Three years ago I presented at the WWA annual conference in Wisconsin Rapids. My idea for writers was simple. Stop doing book signings at bookstores and focus on libraries. A gasp rose from the crowd. Sacrilege! I had to explain when you are at a bookstore you have thousands of competitors an arm’s length away. It is common for an author at a bookstore signing to have fewer than five people buy their book; many times they sell none!

Libraries are different. Your competitors are available for checkout, but a signed copy is available only with purchase. Libraries are hungry for authors willing to speak to their patrons. Not only will you sell books, you will also get paid for the speaking engagement in most cases. Libraries are the unsung heroes for people looking to supercharge their writing career.

I went into more detail at the conference than I will here. I will chase to the end. During the 50 minute presentation I outlined how an author can earn six figures annually working ten or fewer hours per week. I was soundly admonished. Authors disagreed vehemently that this would work. I stood my ground. As the presentation came to an end a man in the back of the room raised his hand and said, “I am with the Door County Library system and what Keith has said is 100% true. We can’t get authors to show up even when we pay them. And when authors work with us they sell books and get paid for that too. We also sell the author’s book at wholesale price to patrons so the author sells even more books and gets more royalties.” I rest my case.

My oldest daughter, Heather, was in the audience that day. She is also the only one who took notes and followed through.

Play all Day

Heather is not a normal kid; she is a lot like her dad. She does not want to run a business like I do, but she isn’t excited about working for the man. She struggled with her true dream: art. The kid is talented, for sure, but so are another couple million people, too. Heather wanted to attend art schools around the planet and I refused to pay her way. I told her she doesn’t want to produce the same art everyone else is producing. Be different if you want to survive with art.


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Early Retirement versus Laziness




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Look at all those crazy retired people. They are so lazy as they sit there on top of a mountain they climbed.

Pete over at Mr. Money Mustache does not publish as often as he once did. I still check in now and again to see what Pete is up to. Even when there are no new posts people still comment on previous posts. A few days ago a comment grabbed my attention. In short, the commenter stated she thought Pete was anything but lazy. This got me thinking.

The post in question was actually written by Mrs. Money Mustache. (I’ve been in the mustache house. She really does have a mustache. Damndest thing I ever saw.) She said she felt like a “Lazy Log” compared to Pete who is “extremely self-motivated”. As their accountant I can attest neither are lazy. On a fairly consistent basis Pete contacts me on a tax related topic he is working on.

As most of you are aware, MMM retired at 30 and is living the good life. The argument over the years has revolved around ‘Is Pete really retired?’ The answer, of course, is yes. Mr. and Mrs. MM are retired and living the life they want. The next question then is “Are all these early retire people lazy asses?’ That is the topic of today’s discussion.

Busier Retired than when Working

I have noticed in my office that when many people retire they end up busier than when they were punching a clock. For some reason a job screws up your personal life so there is no time for major projects that sooth the soul. Once you put ‘organized labor’ behind you (don’t confuse with union labor) you are now free to pursue the things you want. Most people are like me, brimming with thoughts and ideas racing through their mind. Once the floodgate is opened it is unstoppable.Continue reading

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Plate Lickers Unite: Leave Your Money at Home




img_20161012_063728In the United States we have a ritual we put people through age 50 and over. It starts slow and builds momentum. The first indication shows up in the mailbox offering loads of financial information and a FREE! meal. In no time our kind 50 year old has a mailbox full of invitations for free dinners. There are opportunities to screw the Social Security system, opt out taxes, earn huge yields on your investments, and the best ones scream THE SKY IS FALLING!!! and only they can save you.

The answer to each problem, of course, is to invest in what they are selling, usually annuities. Fuck’em! I call their bluff and sign up for every free dinner gracing my mailbox. By now I must be the most sought after seminar attendee on Earth. There is a name in the industry for people like me: plate lickers. I love it!

Mrs. Accountant and I rarely go out to eat, but when we do it is usually free. Restaurants I would never try now get scratched off my non-existent bucket list. All because I am a plate licker.

Now before you think ill of me, let me explain. My goal is never to harm the presenter. They offer the free meal and information; all I do is take them up on their offer. If they ever come up with a valuable product I am more than willing to pry open my wallet and blow out the cobwebs.

Baby Boobers

My dad was born the first year of the baby boom and I was born the last year of the boom. It’s an interesting fact that has nothing to with our story, but something I find interesting. The Baby Boom finally ended because guys discovered coitus interruptus. Child support attorneys have seen declining sales ever since. Back to our story.

As a Baby Boomer I get lots of invites. Tuesday night Mrs. Accountant and I attended one of these free meals/seminars. As always, the food was great. I had high hopes going into this one. The invite promised and 8% return investing in mortgages backed by assisted living homes. I understand the demographic and the profit potential so the idea intrigued me. The vast majority of my money is invested in Vanguard index funds. A few hundred thousand in my portfolio is looking for a home with a fixed rate worth accepting. Eight percent backed by local assisted living homes held promise.Continue reading

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