Category

Early Retirement

Early Retirement, Frugal Living, Lifestyle

Tax Deductible, Low Cost, High Speed Internet You Can Take Anywhere

Internet service in the U.S. can be spotty for people living out in the boondocks, like your favorite accountant. Travelers need to hunt for an open Wi-Fi hotspot to stay in touch. Even worse, internet is frequently bundled with cable, forcing you to buy both or face wildly overpriced stand-alone internet service. They got you where they want you and your pocketbook is the victim. There has to be a better way. There is. And since I’m an accountant I want a big tax deduction too.

Internet service can cost $50 a month and more for high-speed broadband. (Please sit for this next part. I don’t want anyone falling and getting hurt.) How would you like fast internet (I’m talking 10 Mbps and higher with 10 people on at the same time) for $41.67 a month, paid annually? That works out to $500 per year. After the first year the cost drops to $400 per year or $33.33 per month. You can take this little gem with you on vacation, too. Your fast and low-cost internet is as small as a cell phone, has a 10 hour battery life and is very portable.

Okay, enough of the baiting. Time to get down to facts, get a tax deduction and details on obtaining this money-saving, tax deductible gem.

Continue reading

Related posts
Everybody is Talking about the New Forum on The Wealthy Accountant
March 23, 2017
It’s a Small World
March 20, 2017
Thriving on Minimum Wage
March 15, 2017
Early Retirement, Frugal Living, Lifestyle

Thriving on Minimum Wage

Minimum wage to riches.

Complaints about wages are rampant in the current news. The common wisdom is wages are too low for people to save for retirement or even pay for basic needs. Today I will dispel this common wisdom and prove 1.) Minimum wage, while not very much, is more than enough to live on; 2.) You can get a pay increase even if the boss refuses to pay you more than the minimum wage; and 3.) Early retirement is possible even at minimum wage and in fact you are more motivated to reach early retirement goals when you are locked at the lowest pay scale allowed by law.

I know I’m coming across as a dick to many people. But I’m right and you know it. I can and will deliver on all three points above in one short blog post. The problem with reaching these goals is you and your spending habits.

My dad grew up on a farm and started his own agriculture repair business back in the early 80s. He noticed his employees were no better off regardless what he paid them. Some were paid very well and still were flat broke.

I see the same thing in my practice among employees and clients. With a larger group to sample, my data is conclusive: Income is not the problem, spending is. Where you live has nothing to do with it. Nothing! Living in a high-cost area of the country usually means minimum wage is higher than the federal minimum wage. Since a few will refuse to believe me, I also included point #2. If you are so underpaid you should be excited to know I can guarantee you a pay increase on a regular basis. That means minimum wage will be history for you, my friend, and your employer can’t do a damn thing about it.

Continue reading

Related posts
Tax Deductible, Low Cost, High Speed Internet You Can Take Anywhere
March 24, 2017
Everybody is Talking about the New Forum on The Wealthy Accountant
March 23, 2017
Stop Paying Your Quarterly Estimated Taxes!
March 22, 2017
Early Retirement, Lifestyle, Small Business

What the Wealthy Accountant Owns and Why

In my last post I discussed how difficult it is for personal finance bloggers to find fresh material. There are a few areas where fresh material is always available: spending reports, net worth reports, and investment reports. My spending is boringly low so I rarely share those numbers. Net worth reports are fun to watch as people go from zero to millionaire; afterwards it becomes bragging and tends to discourage those starting out.

Even though we all have a timeline where we reduced/eliminated debt and built our net worth, each personal story is a marker along the road to financial independence. Readers love these stories because it provides a framework as they reach for their financial goals.

Killing debt is hardest once the habit is established. It seems impossible for those buried in debt to see any light at the end of the tunnel. Hell, they think the tunnel is a bottomless pit. And it can be if they don’t crucify their old habits! Dear Debt is an awesome example of a young woman breaking up with debt and getting her life back. She said it better than I ever could because I didn’t dig the hole as deep in my younger days. And not because I am smarter. I just had fewer opportunities to be stupid. (Note: You are not stupid, Melanie!)

Net worth reports are great for illustrating how fast a nest egg can grow. When you start it looks so small at first. Debt is gone and you amassed a whopping $10,000. Big deal. Well, it is a big deal! Financial independence is gained one dollar at a time. Watching others further along in the process is motivating for some. Here is another young woman well on her way to financial independence at the ripe old age of 26. She will reach FI sooner than she plans. It’s how it works. And here is a blogger who planned on reaching FI in 1500 days and showed up early. How rude! They should have made an appointment first.




Continue reading

Related posts
Applying Cost Segregation on a Tax Return
March 27, 2017
Tax Deductible, Low Cost, High Speed Internet You Can Take Anywhere
March 24, 2017
Why Trade Wars Never Work
March 17, 2017
Early Retirement, Frugal Living, Lifestyle

Stop Working for Money

Have you ever wondered why Elon Musk keeps pushing so hard? A hundred million from PayPal wasn’t enough, I guess. Building the greatest all-electric car is not enough for Musk, either. He also wants to fundamentally change the way humans see the world by starting a company called SpaceX. As I write, Musk promised to take two people to the other side of the moon and back next year! Talk about pushing yourself.

Before you start thinking Musk is a slacker, he also has this thing he manages called Solar City. If you want to build the greatest electric car ever you may as well figure out a way to fuel the darn thing for next to nothing. Right?

You would think running three large companies at the leading edge of technology would be enough for a 45 year old man with plenty of money to kick back and spend the rest of his life gloating. If you think that you don’t know Elon very well. He wants to put mankind on Mars in the next decade and send the species even further into space. His dreams never stop flowing and he makes them real against all odds. Just one great feat of Musk’s would make anyone’s career complete. So why does he do it? Why does Musk keep dreaming and then putting those dreams into action?




Continue reading

Related posts
Tax Deductible, Low Cost, High Speed Internet You Can Take Anywhere
March 24, 2017
Everybody is Talking about the New Forum on The Wealthy Accountant
March 23, 2017
It’s a Small World
March 20, 2017
Early Retirement, Frugal Living, Lifestyle, Taxes and Investing

Here is How You Can Piss Off Donald Trump

Disclaimer: This is not a political rant! The time is ripe for this message and Trump happens to be President. It is meant as satire wrapped around a serious message you must follow or suffer the financial consequences.

Nothing is more fun than good times. The recent run in the stock market in nothing short of incredible. After years of slow growth economy and low inflation coupled with a rising stock market, the stock market has exploded. The chart has gone parabolic! But this is not a story about investing or the stock market, however. This story is about pissing off Donald Trump.

Promises of faster economic growth and more high paying jobs face reality after Election Day. President Trump has hitched his wagon to a promise of hyper economic growth, in the neighborhood of 4% or higher. Depending on the day, a lot higher. I’m guessing if things go well we can see wages double every three, maybe four, years. And the best part, no inflation while the government pays off the national debt and increases spending across the board. Such are the promises of politicians.

And in these “best of times” you think it will last forever. Think 1929 or 1987 or 1999. Oh, for the heady days on 1999 when broad stock indexes sported triple digit P/E ratios. How can you lose? The future is clear to the horizon. Life is good, just ask the government.

Continue reading

Related posts
Applying Cost Segregation on a Tax Return
March 27, 2017
Tax Deductible, Low Cost, High Speed Internet You Can Take Anywhere
March 24, 2017
Everybody is Talking about the New Forum on The Wealthy Accountant
March 23, 2017
Early Retirement, Small Business

Starting a Successful Seasonal Tax Preparation Business

Readers of this blog are always looking for a side hustle. Seasonal tax preparation is a perfect fit for many early retirees. A small tax preparation business allows for an earlier retirement as the side income can easily be enough to live on for even a modestly frugal person. Another large reader demographic involves the accounting industry. There are plenty of blogs talking about tax issues, but few discuss the realities of starting, promoting and maintaining a tax practice.

I touch on the subject of practice building periodically, but my email folder is filled with requests for a more detailed post. A recent email from someone called Speed (I love it!) asked a series of questions that encompasses the bulk of practice management requests.  Much of what I discuss can be applied to most other business ideas with only slight modifications.

Rather than give a play-by-play on starting and managing a tax practice, I will take each of Speed’s questions and answer them. The reason for avoiding the play-by-play is because there are many ways of starting a successful business. I don’t want to give the illusion you are locked into one pattern to win. Life is rarely that neat.
Continue reading

Related posts
Applying Cost Segregation on a Tax Return
March 27, 2017
Stop Paying Your Quarterly Estimated Taxes!
March 22, 2017
It’s a Small World
March 20, 2017
Early Retirement, Estate Planning, Lifestyle

Leaving a Legacy Without Destroying Your Children

Reaching financial independence requires a consistent set of skills and persistence. The habits that allowed you to amass a sizable nest egg don’t die just because you pass some arbitrary border. Education, job, and family life consume all your time in the beginning.

After college it is time to earn a living. After finding a job it is time to climb the ladder, all the while saving a massive percent of your income to reach your financial goals.

Family is a priority. A significant other and children take time and money. You increase your saving and investing skills. Raising a family is expensive only if you don’t know how to shop. You hit the rummage sales and thrift shops for kid’s clothing, toys, height chair, car seat and other stuff the youngsters will grow out of quickly. Later you sell the kid’s stuff for about what you paid for it at a rummage sale of your own, passing the same opportunity you had to another young couple.

And then it happens. Your hard work, intelligent spending and diligent saving pay off. You reached financial independence earlier than planned. Now you have another problem you never gave much thought to before: your legacy. If you reach financial independence early, how large will your net worth grow before you leave this world?

Thinking about your legacy when you are still in the building stages is hard. It requires looking into the eyes of the possible: early death. What happens if you die while the kiddos are still minors? A plan is needed. Even if the kids are grown, a plan of succession is necessary. And what if kids are not part of the picture? Then what happens to your legacy? Let’s explore the possibilities.

Continue reading

Related posts
Applying Cost Segregation on a Tax Return
March 27, 2017
Why Trade Wars Never Work
March 17, 2017
Thriving on Minimum Wage
March 15, 2017
Early Retirement, Lifestyle, Small Business

The Clock is Ticking

When my accounting practice went from a part-time seasonal pastime to a full-time firm I needed to bring in talented employees. Bev, a close friend of the family, had many years of experience working for other tax firms so I asked her to work for me. She accepted the offer.

Decades started to pile up. The joke around the office was Bev worked for my firm longer than I had. It wasn’t far from the truth. Bev was always a talented and faithful employee. She did good work and I could trust her.

But time counts, and keeps counting. Bev had something few people ever possess: talent and personality. Clients loved Bev and for good reason. She knew her stuff and made people around her feel comfortable. In my darkest hours she was there to hold the firm together. When my youngest daughter was born with birth defects she kept the office open while my mental wounds healed.

I have fond memories of those days. I also remember how it ended. Bev comes from a farming background; solid German stock. What I mean to say is she isn’t a petite girl. Wisconsin winters can be brutal. Arctic blasts made it difficult for her to breathe outside. I was worried about her. It was the excuse used to force her to retire.

But that was a lie. The truth is something was changing in Bev. It started slow and steadily advanced. She wasn’t as good at taxes as she once had been. Once she was great at taxes, now she was merely good and rapidly approaching mediocre. It is a terrible thing to say about someone with such an honorable and distinguished career.

I noticed the changes in Bev when she reached her mid-60s. It was small at first. Little things were missed. Sometimes the tax return was correct, but little things around the tax return were forgotten. A note was not updated; a basis statement not completed. And clients still loved Bev.

Each year got progressively worse until the work was unacceptable. I had to review all her work at a much higher level. Bev had to go. It was not an easy choice. She accepted her retirement and took to it like a pig takes to shit, but she was hurt at the time. She still brings her personal tax work in for us to prepare.

Is that Footsteps I Here?
Continue reading

Related posts
Applying Cost Segregation on a Tax Return
March 27, 2017
Tax Deductible, Low Cost, High Speed Internet You Can Take Anywhere
March 24, 2017
Everybody is Talking about the New Forum on The Wealthy Accountant
March 23, 2017