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Early Retirement

Early Retirement, Lifestyle, Taxes and Investing

Financial Independence for Normal People

51efot8iakl-_sx324_bo1204203200_Discussions around here have focused on early retirement and financial independence with a few assumptions: either you own income properties, own a business, or have a side hustle. But what about the other 95% of the people working their tail off, day in and day out, looking for a retirement plan? For those fine folks I have a treat today. We will focus on normal people and wealth accumulation. We will avoid tax talk because income level and type of income create too many variables muddying the conversation.

You would think it should be simple if you are a wage earner only, but it’s not. There are several choices you need to make to maximize your wealthy building. Accelerating to the early retirement line is straight forward if you know where to start. Without passive income like rental properties you only have your earned income (wages) to rely on. Your passive income will be limited to dividends, interest and capital gains.

Building an Empire

There are two parts to living the Financial Independence (FI) lifestyle: the building phase and the maintaining phase. During the building phase you save like crazy. My recommendation is to save half of what you earn. It is more important than ever to have a high savings rate if you don’t own rental properties or have a side hustle. It will take 16-17 years to reach FI at a 50% savings rate assuming a 5% growth rate and a 4% withdrawal rate once retired.


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Dealing with Jealous People

4482714827_491d395f7e_bReaders of this blog are committed to financial discipline. They save a large portion of their money and invest it wisely in index funds and real estate. Whatever is left after investing they consider spending . . . maybe.

Before long the value of the index funds grow significantly and the investment properties gain more equity while throwing off a steady stream of passive income. People begin to notice. You, one of the mentioned readers, drive a less than fancy car and have a modest home or apartment. People also notice you brown bag lunch at work and rarely party with the crowd. Instead of the bar scene you invite friends over for a cookout and a few cold ones.

Everyone around you notices how much less stress you seem to have compared to them. You make it look easy. And you have money. Of course, you do. Because you don’t spend every penny you earn. It starts with one person feeling resentment and spreads like a bad rash. For the first time you feel the sting of jealousy. People you care about and admire now have turned against you because you are clearly no longer like them. You lack the fancy house, expensive car and endless nights of fine dining. And how dare you live without cable TV. Is there something wrong with you?


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Take a Selective Vacation to Maximize Productivity

vacation-149960_960_720The past year has been the most brutal of my career. What started out as a good idea has cascaded into a challenge I am still working the details out on. Challenges excite me, but this one showed up unannounced.

Back in the day when I was building my practice I didn’t work that many hours because it was a seasonal business and I saw no need to bust my tail for “a few more dollars”. (A good movie, by the way.) My strategy was simple; always do better than the year before. As the years accumulate, beating last year required more work. It wasn’t money; it was pride.

Eventually I was working way more than I wanted to, so I cut back dramatically and seriously considered selling my practice and living a “real” retirement. The reduced hours and the return to a normal lifestyle (for me) put the “selling the business” idea on the back burner.

It all changed a year ago. This blog and other media attention sent requests for my personal services through the roof. The process of digging out is still ongoing. I had no choice but to say “no” a lot more than I ever had before. That is a difficult pill to swallow because I love working with people and helping clients reach their goals.


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2016 Review; 2017 Plans for The Wealthy Accountant

statistics-706384_960_720Well, the first year is in the books. The Wealthy Accountant came to life on January 15th, 2016 in anticipation of a shout-out by Mr. Money Mustache. The project was on the drawing board for years, however, the workload caused me to drag my feet. But when I start I am all in.

This isn’t the first blog I’ve run, nor is it the only one I write at this time. Running a blog is work and something I held back on because I knew once I started writing this blog it would take over my life. But here I am and I am feeling good.

Other people writing a blog and curious readers are usually interested in statistics. The growth pattern of The Wealthy Accountant is taking a different path from other online venues I used. For example, the website of my tax practice has low traffic and no ad revenue. Just about every visitor of http://taxprepusa.net/ wants to be a client of my firm so we don’t want hundreds of thousands of visitors.

Then there is a content farm I wrote a hundred or so articles for years ago. After Google slapped the funny off the faces of content farm writers I moved my writing elsewhere. Still, HubPages sent me $439.93 in 2016 on 87,719 pageviews. Not bad for not doing a thing on HubPages in five years.


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Making the List

396px-a_list_of_the_names_of_all_the_adventurers_in_the_stock_of_the_honourable_the_east_india_company_the_12th_day_of_april_1684A reader of The Wealthy Accountant recently offered me lunch. I have a weakness when it comes to food. Offer me a free meal and I am virtually a prostitute.

I accepted the offer of lunch for three reasons: 1. He is a local reader; 2. He asked nicely; 3. He wanted to discuss quitting his current job and starting a bookkeeping business as a side hustle. The last point is what got me. A local guy who wants to do bookkeeping is also a guy I might build a strategic alliance with to handle some of my bookkeeping work.

As we talked I shared stories like I do here. Eventually I got to a story I like to tell a lot, but failed to mention on this blog so far. I am not sure where to fit it in, but the story is so powerful it needs sharing. So I decided a story about making a list would be perfect for the Christmas holiday.


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Black Pride Meets White Privilege

text-1442218_960_720There is something wrong with this community. I couldn’t put my finger on it at first. My experiences and worldview didn’t allow me to see the problem. Then it hit me. The personal finance conferences I attend and even the readers of this blog are predominantly white. I felt the issue was so huge I had to write about encouraging minorities, especially the black community, to join our group. Fearful I might come across as a dick, I delayed and delayed. I started writing this post and then threw it away. It was all wrong. How can a white guy from a very white community reach out to the black community?

Then I got the wake up call. I published Overreacting Solves Nothing, where I attempt to calm the crowd after Trump won the election. A few days ago I was called out by a reader. SKG writes, “Easy for you to say not to overreact, you’re white. It’s a whole different story for people of color.” The gauntlet has been tossed and at the risk of coming across as a dick I have to reach out to this massive group of people filled with great pride in their heritage.

As white as the community I live in is, I still have a few black clients. I don’t call them black either; I call them clients. There are more Hispanic people in my community and, as a result, I have more Hispanic clients. Minorities never bothered me. My biggest problem with non-white clients is that sometimes I can’t understand them. Most Hispanics speak English just fine, but some have a strong dialect which I have to concentrate on to understand. When they see me struggle they revert to using Hispanic words because it is clearer for them.


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I’ll Tell You Why You’re a Failure




8226451812_88007f08df_bBuying a car is like marriage to me; it is until death do us part. So far she has been the one dying and I remain to keep the memories alive. In 2009 I bought a 2007 Toyota Camry from the local credit union to help them clean up a bad loan. I have never had serious problems, but periodically I have to invest a bit into the vehicle so the ‘ol girl makes it to 20. The Camry had one of those days.

The exhaust pipe broke near the head next to the catalytic. The metal was too thin to weld so replacement was the only option. My neighbor across the road (how convenient living out in the country), Roger, has a lift in his garage and handles most minor repairs for me. I still change the oil so I can brag this accountant gets his hands dirty now and again.

The replacement part had the cat in it so it wasn’t going to be cheap. I went over the O’Reilly Auto Parts for the replacement. It set me back $184. Roger charged me $25 to change it. I knew it was going to be a bit more than a simple muffler repair. When I picked up the section of exhaust pipe the kindly clerk asked me if I was a member of their rewards club. I said I was now. It works like this: for every $150 you spend they send you a $5 coupon for a future purchase.Continue reading

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Stay the Course with Your Investments




dollarrThere are two dangerous times in a retirement plan: when things are going really bad and when things are going really good. We have been lucky the last seven and a half years. The market has marched higher at a steady pace with nary a pullback to be seen. There are people in their 20s who have only seen the mildest of market corrections (a decline of 10% or more) and have never seen a bear market (a decline of greater than 20%).

The steady beat higher for so long is unusual. Regular investments have only known one direction: up. Money invested last year is worth more this year, same for the year before that, and so on. It is easy to invest in such an accommodating environment. The goal of early retirement looks so easy when every year is an up year.

Now the election is over and we have seen a serious move higher in the stock market. Bonds have been down more than stocks are up. The rally is narrow. High dividend yielding stocks and growth companies are down significantly. Banks and other financials are drinking the Kool-Aid. For the first time in years I have clients calling and readers emailing me for my opinion on borrowing money to invest in the market. Ahhhhhhh!Continue reading

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